Tagged: Museum of Arts and Design

VHS in the NYT and QUADEAD @ MAD Museum

Today in the New York Times Arts and Leisure section you will find a little article about the VHS Series at the Museum of Arts and Design.  I know you all already know about it, but that’s because you are hip and you follow the Daily Planet… or maybe because I won’t shut up about it.  Hey you would be running your mouth too if a government funded museum asked you to help curate an exhibition celebrating one of your favorite things in the entire world!  Thank you Bloomie, The Gates and Waterfalls were weak in my opinion but you’ve redeemed your self with this one.

VHS overload!!!

Think about all the people across the country that the NYT will inform, bringing the masses up to speed with all you cool cats.  Now lets get real, its one thing to be in the know, but knowing amounts to nothing more than a pile of beans unless you actually come out and experience it.  And what better way to experience the true essence of VHS than with a screening of Tales From The Quadead Zone, one of the oddest films of the video era.

This Friday July 6th at the MAD Museum, I (Matt D) will host an epic event of analog proportions.  Not only will your eyes be assaulted by the oddity that is Qudead, but be prepared to experience a reel of VHS trailers that could only come from the bowels of forgotten film history. Included will be  Shot on Video trashterpieces, films that have never made the jump to DVD, and more weirdness than may be humanly possible to take, so make sure you mark your calendar because this must see to be believed cinematic experience will be a once in a life time event.

The direct-to-video market not only created more opportunities for creating and distributing breakthrough cinematic works, it also fostered the creation of a new chapter in “trashterpieces,” a genre of camp cinema that celebrates spectacular failures in traditional filmmaking techniques. Affordable home video equipment and an ever-expanding home viewing market paved the way for a slew of aspiring filmmakers. This created a “backyard Hollywood” movement in which many striving artists and opportunistic businessmen could capture and release their visions on video.

A horror anthology in three parts (thereby nullifying the theory that the “Qua” stands for four), Tales From the Quadead Zone is held together by a framing segment in which actress Shirley Jones reads stories to the ghost of her child from a book entitled Tales From the Quadead Zone.  Failing on nearly every traditional level, Tales From the Quadead Zone is often described as a car crash of a film.  However, the film’s earnest ambitions, and resulting great failure, make it a true camp classic made possible by the VHS camcorder.

Special introduction and VHS trailer reel by Matthew Desiderio Producer of the upcoming Documentary Adjust Your Tracking: The Untold Story of the VHS Collector

Tales From The Quadead Zone
Friday, July 6, 2012 – 7:00 pm
$10 general / $7 members and students
The Theater at MAD
2 Columbus Circle
(59th st & 8th ave)
click here to purchase tickets, or call 1.800.838.3006

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Lunchmeat VHS Magazine Presents Mother’s Day at MAD Museum 6/15

Come out this Friday June 15th at 7PM to the second screening in the VHS Series at the Museum of Arts and Design.  Josh Schafer publisher/editor of Lunchmeat VHS Magazine will present a VHS screening of Mother’s Day with a special Q&A session with Richard W. Haines director of Splatter University and Alien Space Avenger!

Museum of Arts and Design is located at 2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Come see VHS get its due respect at the MAD Museum in NYC! The Museum of Art and Design has allowed the likes of VHShitfestHorror BoobsJunk Food Dinner and more to present films of the VHS era that are dear to their hearts. Experience rare SOV classics like Hellroller and Tales From The Quadead Zone on the big screen, come to a live work out session dictated by the weirdest fitness videos in existence, or come and rent a copy of Jerry Macguire from the pop-up rental store. VHS makes anything possible and this is proof so don’t miss this chance to be a part of VHiStory!

In celebration of the influential medium known as VHS, the Museum of Arts and Design presents a three-month survey of the short-lived video revolution. VHS screenings include a wide array of VHS offerings, including rare genre films, bootleg rock concert videos, independent works by the likes of Todd Haynes, Troma Video, and Nam June Paik, live workout classes by Richard Simmons and Susan Powter, and lost public access gems. In honor of its VHS series, MAD has also recreated a video rental store within its walls. In its exploration of the mutliple facets of the format, VHS demonstrates the impact of this technology on the history of cinema.

Mother’s Day
1980, Dir. Charles Kaufman
With Nancy Hendrickson, Deborah Luce, and Tiana Pierce

Troma Entertainment is one of the most famous, and arguably most original, American independent film companies of all time, producing cult classics like Toxic Avenger, Sgt. Kabukiman N.Y.P.D., and Surf Nazis Must Die. In the mid 1980s, Troma embraced the emerging format and became a pioneer in the VHS market.

Written, produced and directed on a budget of only $115,000 by Charles Kaufman, the brother of Lloyd Kaufman, co-founder of Troma Entertainment INC, horror film Mother’s Day follows three girlfriends as they reunite for their annual camping trip. The young friends’ vacation turns into their worst nightmare when they are kidnapped by two demented punk/hillbilly brothers. Led by their insane mother, the brothers drag the young women through deranged scenarios conceived by the sadistic matriarch.

Showcasing new possibilities for breakthrough genre filmmaking, Mother’s Day was an early example of a filmmaker’s creation taking on a new life within the video market. The opportunities introduced by video distribution went on to influence generations of filmmakers.

Don’t miss this most epic analog event because in real life there is no rewind button!

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