Tagged: Yoshihiro Tatsumi

New Manga: Watch Out Fumi Yoshinaga, Natsume Ono Is On The Prowl

By Mat K.

There are a decent amount of books coming out this week, and one title in particular made something fairly clear to me. Natsume Ono is the new Fumi Yoshinaga. “How is that?” you might ask? The beginning of Fumi Yoshinaga’s American career began with Antique Bakery, which brought her unique wispy art style to fans in The States, and separated her from most other manga artists, drawing lots of attention, combined with great story-telling. Also, you can’t forget the gay pastry chef, and various shonen ai undertones. Well, Not Simple, Natsume Ono’s premier book can be described much the same way. Between her very unique art style (more akin to American indy comic artists), and the awesome gay character and other undertones as well as an amazing story, these are what rake in the girl fans. Never mind the fact that her second book was also about a restaurant, and still pretty Boy Love-ish.

When I was going over the new list of things coming out this week, I discovered that there was another new book coming in from Natsume Ono called “House Of Five Leaves“. This would be her fourth title release in less than a year, it looks like someone has a fan over at Viz. In this one a masterless samurai named Akitsu Masanosuke is a skilled and loyal swordsman, but his naive, diffident nature has more than once caused him to be let go by the lords who employ him. Hungry and desperate, he agrees to become a bodyguard for Yaichi, the charismatic leader of a group calling itself “Five Leaves.” Although disturbed by the gang’s sinister activities, Masa begins to suspect that Yaichi’s motivations are not what they seem. And despite his misgivings, the deeper he’s drawn into the world of the Five Leaves, the more he finds himself fascinated by these devious, mysterious outlaws. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

SDCC: Eisner Award Winners 2010

The Eisner Awards were presented Friday evening in concurrence with Comic-Con International at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront.  Onstage guests included the cast of the imminent Scott Pilgrim film, Thomas Jane, Ben Garant (Reno 911), voice actor Phil Lamarr (Futurama, Samurai Jack). The event was MC’d by Maurice LaMarche (“The Brain,” from Pinky & The Brain and notable veteran of many other cartoons).

There were also some real life comic creators there, presenting awards to their  peers, the likes of which included Chris Claremont, Milo Manara(!), James Robinson, Berkeley Breathed, Peter Bagge, James Sturm, and Jillian Tamaki.

The works below are linked to either the item on the FPNYC webstore or the winner’s homepage where applicable.

Best Short Story
“Urgent Request,” by Gene Luen Yang and Derek Kirk Kim, in The Eternal Smile (First Second)

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot)
Captain America #601: “Red, White, and Blue-Blood,” by Ed Brubaker and Gene Colan (Marvel)

Best Continuing Series
The Walking Dead, by Robert Kirkman and Charles Adlard (Image)

Best Limited Series or Story Arc
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young (Marvel)

Best New Series
Chew, by John Layman and Rob Guillory (Image)

Best Publication for Kids
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz hardcover, by L. Frank Baum, Eric Shanower and Skottie Young (Marvel)

Beasts of Burden, winner Best Painter, Best Publication for Teens
Beasts of Burden, winner Best Painter, Best Publication for Teens

Best Publication for Teens
Beasts of Burden, by Evan Dorkin and Jill Thompson (Dark Horse)

Best Humor Publication
Scott Pilgrim, Vol. 5: Scott Pilgrim vs. the Universe, by Bryan Lee O’Malley (Oni Press)

Best Anthology
Popgun, Vol. 3, edited by Mark Andrew Smith, D. J. Kirkbride and Joe Keatinge (Image)

Best Digital Comic
Sin Titulo, by Cameron Stewart

DCD390415
A Drifting Life, winner Best Reality-Based Work, Best U.S. Edition of Foreign Material (Asia)

Best Reality-Based Work
A Drifting Life, by Yoshihiro Tatsumi (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Adaptation from Another Work
Richard Stark’s Parker: The Hunter, adapted by Darwyn Cooke (IDW Publishing)

Best Graphic Album — New
Asterios Polyp, by David Mazzucchelli (Pantheon)

Best Graphic Album — Reprint
Absolute Justice, by Alex Ross, Jim Krueger and Doug Braithewaite (DC Comics)

Best Archival Collection/Project — Strips
Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 1, by Berkeley Breathed, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW Publishing)

Best Archival Collection/Project — Comic Books
The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures deluxe edition, by Dave Stevens, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW Publishing)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
The Photographer, by Emmanuel Guibert, Didier Lefèvre and Frédéric Lemerier (First Second)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material — Asia
A Drifting Life, by Yoshihiro Tatsumi (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Writer
Ed Brubaker, Captain America, Daredevil, Marvels Project (Marvel) Criminal, Incognito (Icon)

asterios_polyp
Asterios Polyp, winner Best Writer/Artist, Best Graphic Album, Best Lettering

Best Writer/Artist
David Mazzucchelli, Asterios Polyp (Pantheon)

Best Writer/Artist–Nonfiction
Joe Sacco, Footnotes in Gaza (Metropolitan/Holt)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
J. H. Williams III, Detective Comics (DC Comics)

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
Jill Thompson, Beasts of Burden (Dark Horse); Magic Trixie and the Dragon (HarperCollins Children’s Books)

Best Cover Artist
J. H. Williams III, Detective Comics (DC Comics)

Best Coloring
Dave Stewart, Abe Sapien, B.P.R.D., The Goon, Hellboy, Solomon Kane, Umbrella Academy, Zero Killer (Dark Horse); Detective Comics (DC Comics); Luna Park (Vertigo)

Best Lettering
David Mazzucchelli, Asterios Polyp (Pantheon)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
The Comics Reporter, produced by Tom Spurgeon

Best Comics-Related Book
The Art of Harvey Kurtzman: The Mad Genius of Comics, by Denis Kitchen and Paul Buhle (Abrams ComicArts)

Absoloute Justice, winner Best Graphic Album (reprint), Best Publication Design
Absoloute Justice, winner Best Graphic Album (reprint), Best Publication Design

Best Publication Design
Absolute Justice, designed by Curtis King and Josh Beatman (DC Comics)

Will Eisner Spirit of Comics Retailer Award
Vault of Midnight, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Hall of Fame
• Burne Hogarth
• Bob Montana
• Steve Gerber
• Dick Giordano
• Michael Kaluta
• Mort Weisinger

Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award
Jeannie Schulz

Bill Finger Award for Achievement in Comic Book Writing
Otto Binder, Gary Friedrich

Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award
Marian Churchland (Beast)

Post to Twitter

Black Blizzards Beat Gundams

By Mat K.

So its a reeeeally small week this week, about 10 books. Three of those books are Mobile Suit Gundam related. First up is the 9th (and I believe final) volume of Gundam: Ecole Du Ciel. In case you were curious, Ecole Du Ciel first started coming out in the states in 2005. That’s five years to put out 9 books. The only excuse for that kind of fan-teasing is some horrible debilitating disease that left the artist minus both their hands for a couple years. On top of that, Tokyopop seems to think they are justified in raising the price on the book not only to $10.99 like they did the rest of their series, but instead this final volume is going to be $12.99, like anyone who even was reading the series 5 years ago hasn’t already fallen out of love with, or plain old forgotten about the whole thing. I know they had issues with a lot of downsizing in the last couple years, but it has been 2 years sine volume 8 released, and even that was really far behind it’s predecessor. At some point in the last two years you would think Tokyopop would have switched one of their crappy pseudo-manga books if just to finish a series that at least has pretty covers and nice artwork. But I digress.

The other two Gundam books coming out this week are Gundam 00 Season 2 Volume 1, (I hazard calling books by seasons, since it confuses people with the DVDs, but hey, that’s how it’s listed), and the first Gundam 00 Lite Novel. So, all you Gundam fans enjoy this week, despite the fickle weather. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

Kai-Ming Cha’s Top Ten Manga of 2009

Well-respected manga blogger and FP buddy Kai-Ming Cha has posted her Top Ten Manga of 2009 list, along with some industry analysis, to Publishers Weekly. Comprised mostly of titles geared for an older readership (sorry, kids- no Naruto, nor free hugs here) it’s an eclectic brew.

What made #1?  Why, Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s A DRIFTING LIFE of course!!! Natch…

DCD390415This may not be fair, entirely. I spent more time with Tatsumi’s A Drifting Life than I did any other book this year. And it was well worth it. Tatsumi’s illustrated text, (historic, autobiographic, economic) of the Japan that he grew up in and the growth of the industry there that we currently know as manga, is an even handed, revealing work of graphic prose that evokes the youth and imagination – as well as the industrious nature – of a young artist. Soon after publication, A Drifting Life was awarded the Osamu Tezuka prize in Japan. Well worth an Eisner in this country, and well worth owning.

Although I wholeheartedly agree with her on many of her selections, Kai-Ming should be taken to task for rating badass Death Metal comedy DETROIT METAL CITY at a lowly #5.  Shame on you, Cha.  Shame on you.

dcd392379

Post to Twitter