Tagged: The Dark Knight Returns

Stand tall for the Beast of America. Or Againist. Your choice.

Welcome back to FPNYC’s offical Bioshock blog (Blogshock? Bioblog?)!! “REAL” Bioshock fans will get the reference in the title, which only make sense if you own a TV. And continue to not comment on the blog. Good times.

I mentioned the existence of a “Bioshock Infinite” art book last week, and now that I’ve beaten the damn game (REALLY good doesn’t even begin to cover the quality of the game, or it’s ending, play it for yourself and I’m fairly confident you’ll agree), I picked a copy of it for myself because I may have an addiction problem of sorts.

So what did I think of it? I’ll get to that in a minute, because I just want to point out that I am  loving the fact that we’re getting quality artbooks based on western video game over here. Bradygames have released some okayish ones, but the books released by Udon (where the crap is the Bayonetta on Udon??)  and more recently Dark Horse are really well packaged, and make for really good reads/collectibles. MORE OF THIS PEOPLE, CHRIS APPROVES!

“The Art of Bioshock Infinite” is a 184 page hardcover released by Dark Horse Comics that clocks in at 9 x 0.9 x 12 inches and retails for $40. While some chapters are light on text, it’s a relatively spoiler-free read, and chock-full of gorgeous art. There’s a lot of cool concept art for things that never made it into the game, or went through a ton of changes. At $40 it’s hard to recommend this book for any non-fans, but if you sunk 12+ hours into the game like I did within a week of it’s release and need a new fix, this is a good way to get it until the board game and/or the Heroclixs drop.

::: Swears this is the last time he’ll mention the game until said ‘Clixs or more toys are released. You are powerless to stop him :::

::: Makes another smarmy remark about reviewing yet another wave of Batman Play Arts figures:::

The newest, and possibly final wave of Arkham City Batman toys via Square-Enix have hit our shelves and man, they are beefy. This time around we’re graced by an extremely jacked version of Tim Drake as Robin (new 52 continuity joke goes here) and the AC take on the classic Dark Knight Returns version of Batman (Frank Miller joke goes here). As you can tell, there’s A LOT  of plastic involved with this figures, which means you’re definitely getting your $60-worth with these figures.

While I’m not crazy about cage-fighter Robin (AC’s continuity is a tad silly in some areas) look, I have to admit that the figure captures the design well. Both he and Batman sport 26 points of articulation, and come with variant hands, heads, and some accessories; a bo staff for Robin, and a grappling hook for Batman. I would have gone with a mud-covered mutant gang member corpse myself, but that’s just me. And yes, Robin IS in scale with the standard AC Batman & Catwoman figures, and I guess the DKR Batman too, even though blah blah canon, blah blah nerd, blah blah prostitute joke.

I am such a good blogger you guys.

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New Arrivals: Tiger and Batman

::: Insert an 1,000 word capslock word-vomit article about San Diego Comic Con News and the arrival of his Figma Samus Aran figure here::

Honestly, if I could get away with that folks, I would.

Doing my best to ignore new developments over at SDCC, let us take a look-peak at what’s new on the shelves of Forbidden Planet NYC. As we’ve stated at least a half-dozen times on the blog to date, there’s a new Spider-Man movie out, and with a new movie comes new merchandise (:: Pats himself on the back for that one :: ) Marvel Select has released 2 figures based on the movie, a decently poseable Spider-Man, and the Lizard. For the $20 they’re retailing for, the figures are actually quite solid on the paint, sculpts, poseablility end of things. There’s also a ton of Avengers figures, available in both movie and comic versions, out in the Selects line, so you should check em out. On the 3.75″ side of things, Hasbro has a plethora of Spider-Man figures out, based on both the movie and comics. The comics end of the line are a lot of repaints/re-releases from past Spidey-lines/Marvel Universe line. The movie-side of things has an awesome Ultra-poseable Spidey figure, which is worth if you really like the new movie comics. Those goes for about $12-$13 each.

Aside from superheroes with movies, FPNYC has also received a ton of merch based on superheroes from Japan. The “Tiger And Bunny” merchandise train continues to ride on, as there’s a bunch of new gasaphon figurines in stock, and some more high end stuffs from the Figuarts line. The newest release in the Figuarts line is Origami Cyclone, which in terms of cash value, you definitely get the most bang for your buck. The articulation, sculpt and paintjob are as good, if not better than the previous releases. But when you get to the accessories department, this is where Origiami surpasses the others. Aside from the standard base, you get a a back mounted giant shuriken AND a holdable giant shuriken, an empty back holster, two katana hilts/blades/ holsters, a small shuriken, two giant shuriken holding hands & two katana holding hands. That is a lot, especially for less than $60. On the other end of the spectrum there’s ZeroArts Kaburagi T. Kotestu (Wild Tiger). Kotestu is basically a cheap statue, better than your average gasaphon figurine, but not as good as a higher-end statue (Or the Portrait of Pirates line). But it does come with a stand, and an alternate arm that can hold a stuffed Bunny. Again it’s okay for $50, but for $7 more, you can get an articulated Figuarts Wild Tiger figure. It’s a matter of preference and taste in the end. Continue reading

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At Long Last, an Edgy Batman

Sorry I wasn’t around last week…I took the week off in order to save up enough money to buy this week’s TOP TWO NOT TO BE MISSED HITS!

In 1988, a few years after they published The Dark Knight Returns and a year after Watchmen, DC released another grim and gritty comic steeped in the flavor of the times called Batman The Cult. Penned by Jim Starlin (who had garnered attention at Marvel through his work on Adam Warlock and Captain Marvel) and drawn by the legendary Bernie Wrightson, Batman The Cult also featured Bill Wray (creator of Hellboy Jr. and notorious Ren & Stimpy background artist) on colors.

Batman The Cult almost reads as an Elseworlds story, as it is based on a premise slightly unsavory to Batfans: What if a foe psychologically broke Bats? This theme of ultimate defeat reappears from time to time, most notable in Knightfall and Batman R.I.P., though The Cult tells it tough and stark.

Batman is kidnapped, starved, beaten, drugged and abused to the point where his brain gets woozy enough to break. This torture is administrated at the hands of a mystic in the guise of a slum preacher named Deacon BlackFire. Blackfire then uses Batman as a killing machine against his enemies…yes Batman kills. With Guns, TOO!

In this story Batman uses guns (loaded with both bullets and tranquilizers), drives a monster truck version of the Batmobile, and features Jason Todd in one of his best pre-death appearances. Does Batman save the day and overcome all obstacles? Not without scars, he doesn’t!

The Cult is…an interesting story. Batman is after all a man. Men do fail. Batmen must also Bat-Fail. The Cult is a well rounded look at Batman’s mental frailty, far subtler than Arkham Asylum and WAY subtler than Batman R.I.P.

Curious? Check it out. But not this week. THIS was all a preamble for this week’s recommendation: Continue reading

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Watchmen 2: Watchpets

By Unkiedev

The internet, Comic Book’s hotter, younger brother, is flapping its gums all over the place about a reported (and only rumored) Watchmen prequel comic book series to be published at DC helmed by the steady hand of Darwyn Cooke.

There are as many questions to ask here as there are cyanide capsules in Adrian Veidt’s purple sports coat pocket…ya’ know, for tying up loose ends. CAN they do this, HOW will they do this, SHOULD they do this, and even HOW CAN they do this? What will Alan Moore say?

Don’t worry about Alan. Alan is comfortable, respected, wealthy, cynical, and will never, ever set his eyeballs on these pages. Worry about the guy in the hot seat here. Worry about Darwyn.

DC: THE NEW FRONTIER, Darwyn Cooke (W/A), DC

Darwyn Cooke is a great illustrator and writer who studied under Bruce Timm during the first Animated Batman show, though rose to prominence with his extremely readable graphic novel DC: The New Frontier. Set in post war America, New Frontier is essentially an Elseworld story to bridge the gap between the Golden and Silver age DC comic book worlds, though with more emphasis on drama, alienation, and historical context.

It looked great and it read great. DC ultimately loved it so much that they gave it the Absolute treatment: collecting it (as well as additional material) into a lovely, gigantic hard bound edition. DC then adapted it into the well received direct-to-DVD movie of the same name.

To say it stood on the shoulders of giants would be extremely kind. A more honest assesment would be to describe it as a pop culture mash-up of THE GOLDEN AGE; the dark but kick ass 1993 DC comic by James Robinson (W) and Paul Smith (A); and JLA: The Nail by Alan Davis. BOTH of these comics are SENSATIONAL, not to be missed comic books one should check out immediately! Continue reading

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Silence is Golden

By Unkiedev

Comic books are the perfect marriage of pictures and words…but even the best couples need to take a break from one another from time to time!

There is a great tradition of comics without words, or silent comic books.  Sometimes the entire series is done in this fashion, although sometimes it’s just a one-off, fun gimmick. Sergio Aragone’s has two collections of some of his best doodles titled Actions Speaks and Louder Than Words, but he’s not the only talent throwing the English language in the crapper.

To some, Frank Miller is the quintessential God of comic books, the brilliant mind behind the ultimate Batman story The Dark Knight Returns and the genius behind the sensational films/comics 300 and Sin City. My review of the man would be somewhat less enthusiastic.

Still, the guy did do some great work, such as the silent comic Sin City: Silent Night. In Silent Night, a Dark Horse one-shot from 1994, tough guy Marv wordlessly strides through some of the most gorgeous brush and ink work Miller has ever committed to paper on his way to rescue a kidnapped little girl during a snow storm. Beautifully evocative white splotches fall slowly on scenes of grizzly death and torture as Marv slices, punches, and kicks his way through hired thugs.
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