Tagged: Stephanie Hans

Get Ready For Diana’s Close-Up With The Wonder Woman Annual #1

Behold the Wonders in Wonder Woman Annual #1

Just in time for the release of her own solo big screen adventure comes an oversized annual issue for Diana of Themyscira. In tribute to the might Amazon princess, DC is giving us a helping of not one, not two, not three, but four stories from various creative teams including Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott, who’ve been working on the “Year One” storyline since DC Rebirth began. Here’s a rundown of the wondrous tales we’ll be getting…

First up, the aforementioned Greg Ruck and Nicola Scott, who’ve been crafting Diana’s early days for the DC Rebirth era have a follow to their seminal Year One storyline. It’s the Rebirth of the DC Trinity! That’s right, the first time Batman and Superman meet Wonder Woman. Hopefully neither the Big Blue Boy Scout or the Billionaire Playboy utters the line, “I thought she was with you.”

Next up, Diana goes on a mission of mercy to the nation of Markovia. It reads like a straightforward and classic moral conundrum that’s right up Wonder Woman’s alley. King Shark is about to be executed for a crime that he’s innocent of (one of the few, one imagines). Former Forbidden Planeteer Vita Ayala pens and artist Claire Roe brings the visual badassery.

In the third story, an old ally of Steve Trevor’s has summoned Wonder Woman to his village to save it from his cursed monster form. This story written by Michael Moreci with art by Stephanie Hans is going to be monstrous, in a good way!

Then in the finale, Wonder Woman must aide A.R.G.U.S. in taking down a Kaiju monster that’s coming to America. Wonder Woman vs Godzilla? Not quite so cut and dry. Once she comes into contact with the creature, Wonder Woman may be tempted to switch sides. This potential smackdown comes from writers Collin Kelly and Jackson with art by superstar David Lafuente.

Get ready to bow down before you plunk down your hard earned dollars for a ticket to, just maybe, the most talked about movie of the summer (sorry, Webhead but you’ve had like five movies in ten years).

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Chris’ Comics: The Wicked and The Divine #15

TheWickedAndTheDivine_15-1The Wicked & The Divine #15

Kieron Gillen, Stephanie Hans, Jamie McKelvie, Matthew Wilson and Clayton Cowles

Image $3.50

The Wicked and the Divine has never been shy about the fact that it’s as much about fans and fandom as is about death. I approve of this sort of examination from the creators’ perspective, as fandom is something rarely discussed in comics aside from the occasional cosplay joke, so to see it explored the way it has been in WicDiv makes the titles one of the most relevant books on the stands, and has made the creative teams a trio of darlings on social media platforms like Tumblr.

Tumblr is a platform that I use sparingly, but one I enjoy a lot. As someone who’s in his early 30s (#KILLME), I feel ancient on the platform, given the average user age is nearly a decade younger, and also the fact that my random dick jokes tend to go over better on Twitter. But I’m well aware that it’s generally the most progressive of all of the social media platform, even though some of those folks are well meaning but still “doing it wrong”. This particular issue of WicDiv touches upon that, making for a fantastic comic featuring a fan favorite character while discussing appreciation vs appropriation.

tumblr_nw81rrxqfQ1rn4nneo3_500Amaterasu was the first goddess we met in WicDiv, yet she’s barely had much exposure since her appearance in that debut issue. Drawing the red-headed goddesses’ tale is Stephanie Hans, who’s worked with writer  Kieron Gillen over on Marvel’s Journey Into Mystery and Angela in the past. She’s a great choice, as there’s something that screams “epic” about Hans’ painted style. Of course I mean epic in the sense of Homer’s Iliad, not as an overused buzzword. It’s a fitting description in my opinion, and a fitting choice of artist, given the fact that it’s about Amaterasu, a goddess who was also featured in a video game Okami, which also had a painted, water brush style as the basis for it’s graphic engine. And since Kieron Gillen use to be a video game journalist for a number of publications, I doubt it’s much of a coincidence! Origins aside, I like how Hans uses the color red in this comic well, as it’s striking when used property. Her character acting is superb, show the cast portraying a number of emotions and looking great while doing so. Hans was the first artist that came to mind when McKelvie’s temporary departure was announced, and seeing her slay on this issue was an absolute treat.

the-wicked-and-the-divine-15-hospitalGillen and Hans have made a really clever comic with this issue of WicDiv. There’s a internet flame war played out as a stereotypical super hero fight that looks great, and gives Amaterasu some need depth Hans’ use of color mixed with Gillen’s sharp dialogue is great here, and it’s Clayton Cowles lettering that really brings the whole thing together. The entire scene is so bombastic and over the top it’s hard not to laugh when you realize why what Amaterasu is doing is so wrong, and the follow up conversation and ending make you incredibly sympathetic towards her.

There’s so much to enjoy with this issue of WicDiv. For starters it’s the first issue in a while that didn’t devastate me emotionally, so that’s cool. But more importantly Gillen and Hans give Amaterasu a some depth, while showing the reader that’s she’s far from perfect but still likeable. It’s a book that’s visually stunning, really smart, and isn’t afraid to have some fun at the audience’s expense. Stephanie Hans is a welcomed addition to this arc of rotating artists, and I hope to see her revisit the title again down line. But as it stands, this is a perfect done in one issue of WicDiv, and one that should be read immediately based on the level of talent exhibited by the creators alone.

 

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