Tagged: Science Fiction

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Graphic Spotlight: SEVEN TO ETERNITY VOL. 1- THE GOD OF WHISPERS

This week we put the spotlight on Rick Remender‘s latest sci-fi sensory overload!

Rick Remender is no stranger to crafting amazing science fiction stories. If you haven’t read FEAR AGENT then you’re missing out on the greatest space western of all-time (yeah, I’m looking at you Firefly and Cowboy Bebop). In 2016 Remender brought us a vast amount of genre treasures in SEVEN TO ETERNITY. This week, the first arc of one of 2016’s best series comes out in trade paperback with an accessible price tag of only $9.99!

Do you love space operas like SAGA? BLACK SCIENCE? PROPHET? Do you love characters whose backs are against the proverbial wall pinned down by overwhelming enemies? Are you a fan of crazy ridiculously beautiful artwork that will expand your mind with new worlds? Then get to know the seven who will hold the fate of a world in their hands with what they do, what secrets they keep, and how fast they can do whatever’s necessary.

A paranoia has spread to every part of the kingdom of Zhal. It destroys like a plague of fear whose source is the God of Whispers. His spies hid in ever hall spreading mistrust, fear, and breeding acts of cruelty that destroy communities and even families. Adam Osidis, a dying knight from a disgraced house is put to a dangerous choice: Will he help a band of hopeless and homeless band of magic users in their attempts to free the world of this evil God? Or will Adam give into what his heart most desires, accepting a promise from the God of Whispers himself. Free the world or free yourself?

Writer RICK REMENDER reteams with collaborators JEROME OPEÑA (UNCANNY X-FORCE, FEAR AGENT) and MATT HOLLINGSWORTH (TOKYO GHOST, WYTCHES) take you down a hard read where men have surrendered their freedom to fear and one last free man is left to choose. Collects SEVEN TO ETERNITY #1-4.

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Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival: Dec 7th-9th, 2012

Do androids dream of celluloid sheep? Perhaps they will during the inaugural Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival, scheduled for December 7th-9th at indieScreen in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (at 289 Kent Ave: directions here). It’s being held in honor of the 30th anniversary of classic sci-fi noir Blade Runner, based on one of mind-bending speculative-fiction author Philip K. Dick’s most famous novels. The festival aims to encourage thought-provoking independent explorations of science as a subject of both fiction and fact.

Films on the festival’s roster include, among others, award-winning dystopian indie Sleep Dealer, psychological space drama The Last Push, and PKD adaptation Radio Free Albemuth, starring Alanis Morissette and Boardwalk Empire’s Shea Whigham. Among the confirmed panelists are physicist Ronald Mallett, known for his inquiries into the possibility of time travel; prolific mystery and science fiction novelist Walter Mosley; Jim Freund, host of radio show Hour of the Wolf; and Dennis Paoli, screenwriter of several Stuart Gordon features (H.P. Lovecraft’s Re-Animator, From Beyond, Dagon).

For further info, click here!

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Charles N. Brown, 1937-2009

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As reported by Locus magazine, science fiction publishing lost one of it’s more ardent and vociferous supporters this past Sunday.

Locus publisher, editor, and co-founder Charles N. Brown, 72, died peacefully in his sleep July 12, 2009 on his way home from Readercon.

Charles Nikki Brown was born June 24, 1937 in Brooklyn NY, where he grew up. He attended the City College of New York, taking time off from 1956-59 to serve in the US Navy, and finished his degree (BS in physics and engineering) at night on the GI Bill while working as a junior engineer in the ’60s. He married twice, to Marsha Elkin (1962-69), who helped him start Locus, and to Dena Benatan (1970-77), who co-edited Locus for many years while he worked full time. He moved to San Francisco in 1972, working as a nuclear engineer until becoming a full-time SF editor in 1975. The Locus offices have been in Brown’s home in the Oakland hills since 1973.

Brown co-founded Locus with Ed Meskys and Dave Vanderwerf as a one-sheet news fanzine in 1968, originally created to help the Boston Science Fiction Group win its Worldcon bid. Brown enjoyed editing Locus so much that he continued the magazine far beyond its original planned one-year run. Locus was nominated for its first Hugo Award in 1970, and Brown was a best fan writer nominee the same year. Locus won the first of its 29 Hugos in 1971.

During Brown’s long and illustrious career he was the first book reviewer for Asimov’s; wrote the Best of the Year summary for Terry Carr’s annual anthologies (1975-87); wrote numerous magazines and newspapers; edited several SF anthologies; appeared on countless convention panels; was a frequent Guest of Honor, speaker, and judge at writers’ seminars; and has been a jury member for various major SF awards.

As per his wishes, Locus will continue to publish, with executive editor Liza Groen Trombi taking over as editor-in-chief with the August 2009 issue.

A complete obituary with tributes and a photo retrospective will appear in the August issue.

Having read Locus religiously for the past fifteen years I can attest that Mr. Brown’s insight, enthusiasm, and voice were singular in the genre. We at The Daily Planet pass our condolences to his many mourners.

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