Tagged: Molly Crabapple

TRY SOMETHING NEW Chapter 24: There’ll Be No Escape For The Princess This Time!

There’s a lot of good comics this week. I know you want to buy the same old ones you always buy because they feel safe and comfortable. I get that. I’m not gonna tell you to not buy the stuff you like. I’m not a jerk. But I do need you to do me a favor. You can do that, right? Sell your kidneys, sell your kids, agree to do illegal stuff for unsavory men, sell your fillings, rob a bank. It’s time to try some new comics. I made a list of which ones you will need to buy if we want this to work out between us. You want this to work, right? You care about me, right? I care about you a lot. You are my favorite reader. I only write this for you. Want me to prove it? I make Tyler put in pretty pictures like this one to make you happy-

OCCUPY COMICS #1 is out this week.  This issue  features political and socially charged short stories by folks like Alan Moore, Mike Allred, David Lloyd, JM DeMatteis, Art Spiegelman, Ben Templesmith, Dean Haspiel, Ales Kot, Ron Wimberly, Molly Crabapple, Charlie Adlard, and a ton more. The book is a benefit for Occupy related initiatives like Occupy Sandy and Strike Debt (google them). Regardless of your personal politics this is a series well worth reading. It offers a ton of interesting viewpoints on a lot of different issues, smart social commentary that cuts across party lines and political aisles. Add to that some stunning artwork and storytelling, and some of the best and brightest in comics doing their best to say something beyond the usual “man punching another man” stories, and this is definitely something everyone who cares about the medium should be buying. Not a lot of comics are going to entertain you this much, inform you this much, and maybe help someone keep their home. Think about that when you choose to buy Red Lanterns instead and wonder why you feel like a husk of a person.

Did I mention that I like DARK HORSE PRESENTS a lot? I do. Issue 24 comes out this week. Congrats on 2 years of putting out the best book no one reads Dark Horse. Among the many great shorts in there, this issue sees the premiere of a new superhero character Blackout. Dark Horse has been doing a great job of getting exciting talent to launch new superhero books that are a fun alternative for those who feel tired of Marvel and DC’s usual fare. X, Ghost, and Black Beetle are among the best superhero books on shelves right now and hopefully Blackout will be joining their ranks. Written by up-and-comer Frank Barbiere, Blackout doesn’t feel like it’s reinventing the wheel, it doesn’t need to. It’s just really good. Barbiere has a knack for playing in genre and doing it better than most and this launch shows him doing that again with ease. Hopefully by this time next year I will be telling you “I told you so” about one of your favorite new series.

Speak of the devil. Mr. Barbiere has clearly been pretty busy. This week also sees the FIVE GHOSTS #3 out. I could write a whole bunch of snarky $#!% about Five Ghosts but I want to give Mr. Barbiere a nice quote for ads and whatnot. Five Ghosts #3 raises the stakes on this already great series in every way. Smart, tense, and beautiful, the best book of the year keeps getting better. Buy Five Ghosts or admit you are fake. Your welcome Frank.

Do you like pretty stuff? Read GODZILLA: HALF-CENTURY WAR. James Stokoe (pronounced “Stew-Coo-Ooo-Whoa-Eee”) is one of the best artists working in comics right now. Like the beautiful bastard child of Paul Pope, Geof Darrow, and Osamu Tezuka, Stokoe has earned a rabid fanbase by quality of work but not quantity of work. I am pretty sure I will never see a year with 12 issues of his work on the stands. With that understanding you should all view the arrival of a whole trade of his work as a sort of holiday. Skip work, buy some diapers and a lot of chocolate milk, get yourself a massage, and rent a new couch because it’s about to get awesome for you. In case the title didn’t make it clear, this book is Stokoe drawing a giant Japanese (Can they claim ownership of him? Should they?) dragon monster thing while it wrecks stuff. Yeah. It’s awesome.

THE PROPERTY is the new graphic novel from Rutu Modan, author of the brilliant Exit Wounds. If you have never read any of Ms. Modan’s work, her stuff reads like Tintin if Tintin was full of powerfully quiet human drama instead of, ya know, racism. It is economical in both art and storytelling, but the story never feels rushed or shortchanged. This is as elegant as comics get. The Property tells the story of 2 generations of Polish women returning to their homeland to reclaim property seized in the holocaust. As the story progresses both the cause and the meaning of this pilgrimage begin to change for the women and what results is a very touching and humorous story about peoples relationships to each other, their history, and the larger world around them.

It is that time of the week when I tell you to buy some new Image comic #1. This weeks obligatory #1 is THE BOUNCE. Joe Casey has written just about every major superhero worth writing and a lot that aren’t. He always makes books that manage to feel smarter and more fun than his contemporaries. Well now he launches The Bounce which is essentially a stoner version of Spider-Man. If there is one thing you should trust Mr. Casey to do it is both examine and deconstruct superheroes in really intelligent ways all while not letting you realize that is happening. He hides the smart storytelling in the fun. That’s smart. I’m tired. Buy this book.

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Graphic Canon Event at The Rubin Museum

To do/experience in NYC this Wednesday, May 23rd…

Size constraints on the Daily Planet and/or your screen probably morph the above image into something Selma or Patty Bouvier might use to screw with you at the DMV, so here’s the above in plain text:

Wednesday May 23, 2012 @ 7:00 PM
Price: $12.00
Member Price: $10.80

Student Rush: $5

5pm-7pm: Himalayan Happy Hour in the café
6:00pm: Pre-program book signing with Graphic Canon contributors
6:15pm: Pre-program tour of the comics exhibition Hero, Villain, Yeti: Tibet in Comics
7:00pm: Book Launch in the theater
8:30pm: Book signing with artists and editor.

Come early for Himalayan Happy Hour and join Graphic Canoncontributors Peter Kuper, Valerie Schrag, Shawn Cheng, Fred Van Lente, Rebecca Migdal, Sandy Jimenez, and Brendan Leach for a pre-program book signing in the café followed by a presentation and discussion of The Graphic Canon in the theater with artists Molly Crabapple, Sanya Glisic and Gareth Hinds and editor Russ Kick.

Ticket includes pre-program tour of the comics exhibition Hero, Villain, Yeti: Tibet in Comics and a book signing with the editor and artists after the program.

Artists Molly Crabapple, Sanya Glisic and Gareth Hinds join Editor Russ Kick for the launch of The Graphic Canon, a gorgeous, one-of-a-kind trilogy that brings classic literatures of the world together with legendary graphic artists and illustrators. Called the “graphic publishing literary event of the year” (Publishers WeeklyVolume 1: From The Epic of Gilgamesh to Shakespeareto Dangerous Liaisons takes us on a visual tour from the earliest literature through the end of the 1700s. It features, The Tibetan Book of the Deadreimagined by Sanya Glisic, Molly Crabapple’s version of Dangerous Liaisons, Gareth Hinds’ watercolor telling of The Odyssey, as well as Hamlet, The Divine Comedy, The Arabian Nights, Tale of Genji, The Canterbury Tales, The Tao te ChingGulliver’s Travels, Don Quixote, Candide, an Incan play, a Native American folktale, works by renowned artists Will Eisner and Robert Crumb and much, much more.

Edited by Russ Kick, The Graphic Canon is an extraordinary collection that will continue with Volume 2: Kubla Khan to the Bronte Sisters to The Picture of Dorian Gray (August 2012), and Volume 3: From Heart of Darkness to Hemingway to Infinite Jest (October 2012).  The entire trilogy features over 189 works of literature visualized by more than 130 illustrators and artists. Most of the works are specially commissioned for this book; some rarely seen before.

Here’s the link to the book on fpnyc.com.  And even if you can’t make it that night, do try to get to the Museum to ogle their fine exhibition Hero, Yeti, Villain: Tibet in Comics before the end of its run on June 11th.

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Segmentation of the Innocent

I had a whole column planned this week about “The Complete History of Earwigs in Comics,” but as my agent pointed out, emphatically and with much passion, “Readers don’t like earwigs.” There’s no accounting for taste. To sum up the article in brief: “there aren’t many.”

We must note the passing of Ralph McQuarrie and Jean “Moebius” Giraud, two of the finest concept illustrators ever to raise pen to paper.  The Forbidden Planet keeps a pretty good stock in movie art books, concept art and other illustrative tomes of nifty drawings. Help yourself get over these sad passings by reminiscing with friends over some collections of their finer stuff.

They say famous people die in threes…I wonder if concept artists count as famous? If they do then H. R. Giger and Geoff Darrow better look both ways before they cross the street. There’s not that many famous concept artists left!

THIS WEEK

Buffy Season 9 #7 hits the shelves when we see print. YEARS ago a new Buffy would have been Earth shattering news, but it seems the ardor has cooled. I might pick this one up…it promises to have Spike and “Big Changes for our Slayer.”

I have NEVER plugged an Aspen book in my life, but I’m intrigued by the premise of Dead Man’s Run, which has a reprint of #2 and a new #3 out this week.  In Dead Man’s Run a cartographer dies and goes to Hell to find the afterlife is like a fiery, maximum-security prison. Dead set on a jail-break, our “hero” is trolling hell to find the toughest dead scofflaws to assist his scheme.  Sure, sounds fun! Continue reading

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More Strange Tales

If I were James Lipton I’d have to say, “I have read Strange Tales #1… and it is awesome.” Forgive me for gushing, but no single issue I’ve read lately has brought such pure delight (I know that sounds kinda dopey, but it’s appropriate) to my grizzled soul, such a contented smile to my cynical face as this comic has.molly

Sean T. Collins has more contributors interviews over at Marvel.com, this time with the lovely and talented Molly Crabapple.

Marvel.com: It’s cool that you’re able to use the piece for more than just a goofy romp with a Marvel character. Was that important to you, as an artist?

Molly Crabapple: I always like to do pieces that are a little more thoughtful and challenging. I mean, I have no problem with goofy romps, but it’s a lot more fun to be able to take a Marvel character and put an entirely different spin on them.

junko

And the always amazing Junko Mizuno::

Marvel.com: So what’s your STRANGE TALES story about?

Junko Mizuno: Spider-Man and Mary Jane move to a town inhabited by Spider-People. In a town where everyone has the ability to web, Spider-Man finds it hard to be a hero and MJ makes every effort to help him stand out.

Marvel.com:  So is Mary Jane the real hero of the story?

Junko Mizuno: I don’t think so…There’s no hero in the story. You’ll see when you read it.

Marvel.com: Why’d you select Spidey and MJ to work with?

Junko Mizuno: I picked them because I like drawing spiders and redhead girls.

She’s fantastic, and so is this comic.

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