Tagged: Mickey Quinn

Chris’ Comics: Snotgirl #1

STL011624Snotgirl #1

Bryan Lee O’Malley, Leslie Hung, Mickey Quinn, Mare Odomo

Image $2.99

Snotgirl #1 is not only the first time Scott Pilgrim/Seconds creator Bryan Lee O’ Malley has delved into a monthly comic, but it also marks the first time someone else is drawing his work. Making her comics debut is Leslie Hung, who teams with O’Malley to tell the story of one Lottie Person. Lottie is 25 year old Fashion blogger who lives in L.A., and is crazy popular on the internet. Her personal life is a bit of a mess though as her friends are constantly flaking out on her, her love life is  a mess, suffering from serious allergies. Also she’s not exactly the nicest person, as O’Malley and Hung have made her a very shallow and self absorbent lead who at times deserves the hand she’s dealt. Having a unlikable character as your lead is a risky move, but it works, thanks to the talent involved.

If there’s anything that you can compare Snotgirl to, it’s shoujo-manga (I.E. manga that’s aim specifically at women). Both the dialogue and manga feel very breezy and flowery, which Snotgirl03I’m sure is intentional; after all given o’ Malley love of manga. It’s also an incredibly smart comic, hidden behind a paper-thin lead. Aside from Lottie dealing with her problems, this book serves as both  commentary and a critique on social media careers while examining the duality of having a online and offline personality.

I absolutely adore the art team of Leslie Hung and Micky Quinn. Hung’s art is gorgeous, well except for the parts where our lead is dripping excessive snot from her nose. It’s manga with a touch of Babs Tarr, meaning it looks VERY 2016. My only nitpick is that there’s a pair of panels at the end of the comic that’s very vague, and I can’t tell if that’s intentional or not. Quinn’s colors are fantastic; very bright and clean, capturing the LA feel of the book exceptional well. Bryan Lee O’ Malley comics always look good, and Snotgirl is no exception to that. I also don’t want to over look Mare Odomo, who handles the letters. Odomo isn’t the first letterer who’s had to work emojis/text messages into a comic book’s narration, but this comic is some of the best use of it I’ve seen in awhile.

Speaking of O’ Malley, I love what he’s down with this debut. He manages to make Lottie snotgirl01-review05really polarizing, but also someone you’ll want to read about. Every time the character has a moment that makes her the least bit tolerable, O’ Malley makes sure there’s a moment that completely undoes that. That’s not to say that there’s nothing endearing about the book’s cat, but O’ Malley throws out a last minute twist that puts and end to that.

Snotgirl is book unlike anything else out. It’s hard to explain why it’s such a amazing read without spoilers, but given the fact that it’s Bryan Lee O’ Malley’s first attempt at a 20 page comic, that’s all you need. But the book doesn’t succeed due to his talents alone,  as Hung, Quinn and Odomo all excel at their respected roles. Snotgirl #1 is fantastic comic with a unique premise, and it’s something you should be reading now versus waiting for the trade.

 

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Chris’ Comics: Jonesy #2

Jonesy_002_A_Main-1Jonesy #2

Sam Humphries, Caitlin Rose Boyle, Mickey Quinn

Boom! Box $3.99

If there was any justice in the world, someone at Cartoon Network or Disney would be writing a big ol’ check to Sam Humphries and Caitlin Rose Boyle for the animated series rights for Jonesy. The way the book is structured and reads is perfect for that Bee & Puppycat/Gravity Falls/Steven Universe demograph, and it manages to be in the same vein of those properties while still being its own thing.

Jonesy #2 sees our lead slacking off on the job so that she can indulge her fandoms and hang out with a friend. Obviously there’s some shenanigans as a result of said slacking, which is good, because it would be a fairly boring comic otherwise. We the readers get a comic that seems deceptively simple at first look, but does so many small things right that Jonesy_002_panel-600x661it’s far more impressive than one would think. First off , I can’t remember any comics aside from maybe the new Marvel Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series that features multiple females persons of color as the focus of the story, especially ones aimed at a younger audience. Representation is important, and it’s nice to see the creators be diverse without getting to heavy handed at any given time. It’s also great to see a character admit they have a crush on another character of the same sex without making a big deal out of the fact that they’re queer. It’s something that doesn’t surprise me given that BOOM! Box also publishes the hit LQBT+ friendly comic Lumberjanes, but it’s nice to see none the less.

I love, LOVE, Caitlin Rose Boyle’s art. The Bryan Lee O’ Malley meets Rebecca Sugar style is so expressive and charismatic, it’s hard to not get lost in the book’s art. Aside from her hyper stylized characters, Boyle does a great job of cramming all sorts of things into the background, giving the readers plenty of incentive to study each panel. Mickey Quinn‘s colors continue to amaze, to the point where I want to stop reading this book in print and see how sharp it looks on my iPad screen. And Corey Breen‘s letters definitely deserve some mention, as the various black bold fonts contrast nicely with the bright colors used by Quinn.

Writer Sam Humphries has done some wonderful things with the 2nd issues dialogue. The 2nd issue seems to confirm how the book will play out (1st starts off with Jonesy, declaring Jonesy_002_PRESS-6something sucks, 2 act ends with Jonesy using her powers and making the scenario worst, third part is the resolution), and that’s fine. Again this book needs to appeals to all ages, and Humphries’ jokes, banter and plotting do so in a way that works for most older readers. As I’ve said in the past, it’s definitely not for everyone, but if your over 18 and wants something lighter in tone (especially compared to what Image offers), Jonesy is the book for you.

Jonesy #2 is a deceptively clever book that feels relevant and fun. A shame it’s only going to be a 4 issue mini series, because I would love to see what else these creators could do with more issues. That being said, the book’s nearly flawless as it, so Jonesy may benefit from less sometimes being more.

 

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Chris’ Comics: Jonesy #1 & Gotham Academy #15

Gotham Academy 015-000Jonsey #1

Sam Humphries, Caitlin Rose Boyle, Mickey Quinn

BOOM! BOX $3.99

Sam Humphries is a creator who’s worked I’ve certainly enjoyed these last few years, but I never had him pegged as an all-ages type of creator. Oh sure The Legendary Star-Lord and the other work he’s done for Marvel are comics #TEENS could enjoy, but I can’t say the same for his very adults only Our Love is Real or his current creator owned title Citizen Jack. However, Humphries is out to prove people like me wrong with Jonesy, a BOOM BOX title aimed at young audiences.

First and foremost, I have to admit it’s kind of refreshing to have a lead teenager female character who’s kind of a jerk. In a world full of Ms. Marvels and Gotham Academys, Jonesy being bitter, selfish and self absorbed makes her a little more believable and very enjoyable, especially when compared to some of her peers. She’s very likable none the less, as Humphries does an excellent job making her very 3 dimensional real fast.

Second, I LOVE Caitlin Rose Boyle’s art. It’s very much in the vein of Bryan Lee O’ Mally (who supplied a variant cover for this book.) and is it the perfect fit for this script. It also reminds me off the art style Rebecca Sugar developed for her hit animated series Steven Universe, which makes a ton of sense for a book that’s suppose to appeal to that fan base. Her art is bold, expressive and a tad bit trippy, mixing manga influence with indie-comic sensibilities. While Humphries name got my attention, Boyle’s art, along with Mickey Quinn‘s coloring kept me interested.

Jonesy #1 is a delightful debut to a fun all ages mini-series. Readers who dig other BOOM! BOX titles like Lumberjanes and Giant Days will probably feel at home with Jonesy, as will anyone who dug Scott Pilgrim but want something a little lighter and shorter to enjoy.

Gotham Academy 015-000Gotham Academy #14

Brenden Fletcher, Adam Archer, Sandra Hope, Zac Gorman, Rafael Albuqerque and others.

DC $2.99

The evolution of Gotham Academy from Harry Potter influence Batman comic to weird alt-comics anthology is something I’ve enjoyed with this “Yearbook” arc. This month Fletcher, Archer and Hope are joined by a quartet of guest creators, including the return of Minjue Helen Chen to the titles. She draws and writes the final chapter of this issue, which is a sweet 3 page story that focuses on Ham, who is a dog. Chen plus cute animals is a good time y’all, and her art is gorgeous.

Zac Gorman‘s comic focuses on the facility of Gotham Academy, and the results are hilarious. The 4 page story wears it’s Batman ’66 influences on it’s sleeve, and the humor is a little more “mature” than what we’re use to from this comic. I loved it, and would pay $3 a month for a spin off comic from Gorman that focuses on Bookworm and Egghead.

The biggest tale of the 2 is a 10 page story co-written and drawn by . Their art styles could’t be any more different (Medeiros is the living incarnate of indie comics, Rafael is much more mainstream cape comics friendly), but the 2 collaborate on a tale that suite both of their styles. It’s a very fun story, that plays with an element of Olive and Map’s relationship in a super fun way.

Bridged together by an tale written by Brenden Fletcher with much improved art from Adam Archer and Sandra Hope is another enjoyable issue in this anthology style arc. It’s been a great job of both introducing me to talents I was completely unfamiliar with, as well as seeing creators I do enjoy work on characters I adore.

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