Tagged: Jonathan Hickman

Creative Conversation With Matthew Rosenberg

Matthew Rosenberg has been a steadily rising star in comics for the last few years. After acclaimed run for his work on the gorgeous We Can Never Go Home, he broke down more doors over at Marvel with his Civil War II: Kingpin mini-series. The reception of which lead to the ongoing Kingpin series he’s currently got the fourth issue of coming out. He’s a creator who’s worked on almost every side of comics. He’s as versatile and knowledgeable a comics creator as there is and with the debuting Secret Warriors #1 coming out next week, Matthew Rosenberg will shock the world with his first team book amidst the turmoil of Secret Empire.

A former Forbidden Planet comics slinger like yours truly, we talk about the series he learned to read from, when he knew comics was going to be his way in the world, and what to expect from the mix of characters he’s getting to write in Secret Warriors!

MK: Welcome to another Creative Conversation. I am joined today by THE Matthew Rosenberg. Thanks for coming in and talking with me today, sir.

MR: Thanks for having me

MK: One of the questions that’s always fun to jump in with is, do you recall the first comic or run that stuck with you?

MR: Well the first comic I remember ever holding was an issue of Fantastic Four that my brother had. I remember carrying it around with me and just staring at the art, but having no idea what was actually going on. The first run I ever read was [Chris] Claremont’s X-Men. I basically learned to read with those books.

MK: Did you ever figure out what issue of Fantastic Four it was?

MR: No, actually. I’ve gone back and tried, but once I learned to read I was a big Fantastic Four fan, so all those blurred together in my adolescent brain.

MK: I’m in a similar boat with an issue of John Ostrander‘s Suicide Squad.

MR: Yeah. I am 99% sure it was John Byrne stuff. But who can say for sure.

MK: Well, no one can say it wasn’t John Byrne (laughs). You talked about Claremont’s X-Men run as what you learned to read on, is it safe to say that run is one that’s influenced you as a comics creator?

MR: Yeah. I think it’s safe to say that it heavily influenced me as a person. I feel like every issue I read of that book exposed me to new ideas and ways of thinking. A lot of my core beliefs go back to that run. And, obviously, my love of comics comes from there as well.

MK: That’s amazing to have that connection so early on. Did you have any other runs early on that helped you fall deeper in love with the medium?

MR: The Marvel Star Wars and GI Joe books were really important to me. I still have complete runs of both. The Mike Zeck Punisher stuff was major for me. Claremont and [Frank] Miller‘s Wolverine stuff felt insane to me in the best way. And the original TMNT was really mind blowing for me.

MK: Tell me you’ve been begging Marvel to work on a Star Wars book.

MR: Begging is a strong word. But yes. I am begging.

MK: I’d love to see you on a Boba Fett or Han Solo series.

MR: Those books have been amazing though, Jordan and Heather who edit the Marvel Star Wars line do a great job of curating it. They aren’t just letting any old riff-raff in the door, which hurts me as a creator, but makes me so happy as a fan. Yeah. There is so much I want to see. I always joke about how much I want to do a podracing comic with Daniel Warren Johnson on art. But I really want to do a podracing comic with Daniel Warren Johnson on art.

MK: I’d read it! Do you remember when you decided that you weren’t just going to be a fan anymore but that working in comics was what you wanted to do? And was writing always the path you saw for yourself?

MR: Yeah. I was working in music for a while and was just getting really burned out. I love music and hate the industry. At that point in my life, the only other thing I was really passionate about besides music was comics. They were a constant for me for almost my whole life.  So when I just couldn’t take doing music stuff anymore I started thinking more about making comics. I knew I couldn’t draw, but I wanted to be creative. My whole family are writers. My mom, my dad, my uncle, my brother. So, as much as it’s possible, writing is in my DNA. And I just sort of dove in from there, with no real idea what I was doing.

MK: You jumped in though! I mean one of the coolest things about your journey, knowing you as long as I do, is that you’ve seen a lot of different sides of comics that not every creator is familiar with. Can you talk a little bit about how you found your way in and the different aspects you’ve gotten to work on?

MR: Yeah. I’m sort of obsessive about stuff. I like to know how things work. So, I studied all aspects of comics I could. I was reading coloring guides and watching lettering tutorials, tracking down interviews with editors. But then I really wanted to know about things more hands on. I quit my day job and took a job at Forbidden Planet so I could really see how books were bought and sold. It’s so crucial for comic creators to understand their readers and their partners in retail. And it was eye opening. From there, I took a job at a few small publishers just doing whatever I could. Retail outreach. Publicity. Social media. Pre-production. Editing. I don’t ever like asking someone to do something for me, without really knowing what I am asking of them. So all of that was incredibly helpful. And it also helped me build relationships and open doors when I was ready to be making publishable work. Or semi-publishable work.

MK: I’d argue it’s all damn publishable! I mean you’ve been hitting home runs with characters like Kingpin and Rocket Raccoon, and now you’re getting your own team book in Secret Warriors, out on shelves May 10th! You’re really building a home at Marvel it feels like. How did this series come about? Did you go to Marvel with the idea for this team or was it a little more of meeting in the middle?

MR: Well thanks. I hope Marvel fans like what I’m doing. As for Secret Warriors, it’s a bit of a funny story. Wil Moss, who was my original editor on my Kingpin mini-series got put in charge of the Inhumans. I am a big Inhumans fan but a huge fan of Quake. I immediately emailed Wil to say that I had an idea for Quake that I wanted to pitch. I sent in the pitch and Wil was really enthusiastic, but he came back and said, “What if Quake was part of a team? We need a new team book.” And from there it all came together in bits and pieces. I feel really lucky because I love our cast. Ms. Marvel is bar none one of the best books at Marvel right now. Moon Girl & Devil Dinosaur has been a favorite of mine since it began. Inferno is a great part of Charles Soule‘s Inhumans run. And obviously Karnak is one of the great Marvel characters. So getting all of these wildly different together it just felt like we had a chance to do something really different and not what folks expect. I’m pretty proud of it.

MK: It’s a very cool mix of characters. What are you excited and hope readers will take away from the first issue on May 10th and from the rest of the first arc?

MR: I really hope people like what we do with the characters. I tried to be really faithful to who they are and what they are about, but we are putting some of them in very new and tough situations. I love them all, and really believe in them, but I want to see them tested. And I hope fans do, too. This book is a little darker and crazier than I think people are expecting. Things are really scary in the Marvel Universe right now, and our Secret Warriors are figuring out the best way to fight back. And that’s not always easy.

MK: Team books like this are always so compelling because of the relationships between teammates. Who do you think would butt heads the most, who might be the wild card, what makes these characters the best fit for this team? If they are.

MR: Well the first part is easy. Quake and Ms. Marvel butt heads the most. Ms. Marvel is a hero through and through. She wants to inspire. She wants to lead by example. And Quake was a spy and a weapon trained by Nick Fury. She knows that sometimes you have to do things that don’t sit right with you because they have to get done. I think Moon Girl is a real wild card. She’s not a team player, per se. She’s smarter than everyone else. And she is really just a kid. As for why they are each the best fit for the team? They aren’t. That’s sort of a real point in the book. They are six characters who are thrust together because of awful circumstances. They each have their own reasons for being there, their own agendas, and their own way of doing things. It’s a stretch to call them a team.

MK: That’s awesome.That’s just juicy to think about and see how they can coexist, if they can.

MR: Yeah. I think people will be surprised at where things end up. Or not.

MK: I love you bringing up Quake being Nick Fury’s apprentice. I remember it was you in fact who got me to read Jonathan Hickman‘s run on Secret Warriors where that relationship developed.

MR: Yeah. Hickman’s Secret Warriors is one of my all-time favorite comics. The way he has Quake and Fury working together, this troubled family dynamic, is so beautiful and heartbreaking.

MK: Totally agree and now she’s kind of in the Nick Fury role herself.

MR: It is something we are going to go into as the series goes on. Fury is gone and Quake is still very new to all of this. She’s tough and capable, but she never had the chance to grow into it. Fury dropped her in the deep end.

MK: To bring things back around a little as we head into the home stretch. you talked about how your whole family are writers. Why write comics? What is about comics versus say film or T.V. or the stage that sets it apart for you as a creator?

MR: I love all types of writing. People in my family have written novels, essays, movies, T.V. shows, plays, you name it. But for me, comics has always been my love. Everything about it from the worlds and characters, to the the tactile feel of a comic, to comic shops and culture. I find it all energizing and inspiring. That’s what attracted me.

MK: Thank you for that. If you could go back, what advice would you give the Matthew Rosenberg who was just starting out?

MR: Save more money. Sell more of your stuff you don’t need

MK: Fair. Totally fair. Which creators are on your personal Mount Rushmore of Comics?

MR: Oh man. Okay. Brian Michael Bendis. Frank Miller. Brian K. Vaughan, Chris Claremont. The Hernandez Bros., Osamu Tezuka, Charles Schulz. My Mount Rushmore is bigger than the other one. Wait! I want to change my answer

MK: Do you need a lifeline?

MR: I’d put Bill Watterson over Schulz. It’s blasphemy, I know

MK: I don’t know if it’s blasphemy. Calvin & Hobbes can be read at eight and twenty-eight and fifty-eight and mean something incredibly important and different at each age.

MR: True. I think Peanuts works on that level, too, in some ways. But Calvin & Hobbes always felt more like a narrative to me. Peanuts was much more of just moments in time. Oh, and Alan Moore. I’m bad at this

MK: You’re not bad at this, you just need a bigger mountain And last but not least, if you were working in  a shop and someone came up to you saying, “I’ve never read comics before, what should I read first?” What five books would you tell them to pick up?

MR: Y: The Last Man. V For Vendetta. American Splendor. Powers. Love & Rockets.

MK: It’s a good list…It’s a good list.  Well thank you, sir, for taking the time to talk with me today. I can’t wait to read the first issue of Secret Warriors!

MR: Thanks so much for having me.

Make sure you pick up your copy of Secret Warriors #1 coming out next Wednesday, May 10th!

 

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Troy’s Toys, But with Comics: Summer events edition

Hey look, me writing about books within a week of their release date again!

secret-wars-1-112759-116869Secret Wars #1

Jonathan Hickman, Esad Ribic, Ive Svorcina

Marvel $4.99

CHRIS FACT: Chip Zdarsky drawing all of my favorites on a variant cover is a surefire way to get me to buy your 5 dollar comic.

Secret Wars is the big 2015 Marvel summer event, and arguably its biggest crossover in sometime. It’s the end game to Jonathan Hickman’s massive Avengers run, AND IT IS BLEAK AS HELL! Marvel has been selling this event with the “EVERYTHING DIES/END!” slogan, and it’s very much the case in issue one.

If you’re looking to pick up this issue and are kind of new to Marvel/Comics, let it be known that Secret Wars is not the most accessible event. If you don’t have some passing knowledge of Hickman’s Avengers run/his body of work at Marvel, there’s a chance you’ll be lost when this issue drop. This doesn’t come as a complete surprise, as Hickman’s always been a writer that play the long game and Secret Wars #1 throws you in the middle of a war and never lets up. It’s easily the least accessible Marvel event in a while, but also one of the strongest starts for one. Hickman’s writing is solid, nailing the voices of it’s large cast perfectly, and handling the dramatics and action well.  His contributions as a designer are also welcomed, even though it’s not much different from what he’s doing over on the Avengers book. But still, the constant clean designed is to be applauded.

Esad Ribic is on art duties for this incarnation of Secret Wars, and he’s a perfect fit for it. His issues on Jason Aarons Thor run were nothing short of perfect, and he’s off to a great start for Secret Wars as well. It’s not flawless (some character appear off model, or change in the book for no reasons), but it’s still damn fine art in the end. The action pieces are incredibly strong, especially come the final pages of this book. Ive Svorcina is back coloring Ribic, and his grainy style is perfect for Ribic’s style. Secret War continues the tradition of a Marvel event looking gorgeous with these creators attached to it.

Secret Wars is an unapologetic Johnathan Hickman book sold as a Marvel event. And it feels like an epic, given the scale and the stakes, and how cinematic Ribic’s art is. Even with the event fatigue setting in with Big 2 comics, Secret Wars feels plenty fresh thanks to the creators involved.

mf6jfizaCa2fZqtvN0b1q-gConvergence: Nightwing and Oracle #2

Gail Simone, Jan Durrsema, Dan Parsons, Wes Ozioba

DC $4.99

This may be the most Gail Simone comic that Gail’s penned for DC. That’s not a problem mind you, as that’s what I signed up for when this book was announced. The Convergence tie ins are suppose to be a celebration of the various eras of DC, and this book genuinely feels like that.

My main complaint about the first issue aren’t to be found with issue 2. Gail script is action packed, and Jan Durrsema‘s is definitely stronger this time around. Her art is great all throughout the book, and doesn’t burn out towards the end like issue 1 did. And because of that, Dan Parsons inks and Wes Ozioba’s colors looks stronger in this issue. It’s a great looking book, filled with fun character moments and some smart twists. And the ending is pretty swell, especially if you’re a fan of the title characters.

I don’t have much else to say about this Convergence tie in, but it definitely sets out what it’s meant to do. If this is the final Gail Simone penned Barbara Gordon story for the time being, I’m more than okay with it. It’s an ending fans of Simone’s Babs will love. It’s also nice to see Dick be Nightwing again (even with Grayson as good as it is), and there’s a appearance by another Simone penned DC A-lister that just as great to see. Convergence: Nightwing and Oracle is the best type of fan service, and a fun comic well worth the $4.

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TRY SOMETHING NEW Chapter 16: Custodian of the Stolen Plans

So last week was my worst column yet. How do I quantify that? Well I thought it was dumb, everyone else who read it also thought it was dumb, and not many people read it. See? Quality isn’t really subjective. So I’m sad to say that was my last column as a comic journalist. I know some of you were living and dying by my recommendations, and to you loyal readers I apologize. The good news is I’m not leaving the Planet entirely. I spoke to the important so and so’s at FP and they, after much crying and pleading, begged me to stay on in some capacity. Especially with Tyler missing, the loss of dear old me might be too much for the old Planet to take. I can’t go into details about the deal but lets just say I can finally afford that sandwich I’ve had my eye on. So here we go with TRY SOMETHING NEW 2.0. as an advice column for all your pressing social etiquette questions, troubling moral quandaries, and secret relationship dilemnas. So, without further ado-

Dear Matthew,

I love your column. You are my hero but I think there is something wrong with me. Nothing makes me happy anymore. I find myself longing for something old yet new somehow. I want action, but not over the top stupid excitement for the sake of it. I want mystery and adventure. Everywhere I turn things seem ugly and unappealing. Am I going crazy? -Ben S. from Dearborn, Mi.

Ben,

There is nothing wrong with you. You just don’t know what you want. You are aimless. Have you ever checked out Dean Motter’s MISTER X? If you haven’t then you probably should. Motter’s retro futurist character returns in this week’s one shot MISTER X: HARD CANDY. Beautiful Golden Age looking art and gritty detective stories that feel like a cross between The Rocketeer and Blade Runner. There was a time when this is all science fiction did, and Motter would have been among the best at that time. Now sci-fi almost never does this type of story and the genre suffers for it. Pick up a copy of this book and see if it gives your life some meaning little buddy.

Hey Matthew,

You are great. Keep being great. I keep thinking there should be a comic that is a post apocalyptic story ala books like Wasteland or Judge Dredd but involve biblical characters like the Four Horseman in some politically intriguing scenarios. This book would be a mess though unless someone awesome like Jonathan Hickman of Manhattan Projects/Avengers/Ultimates fame helmed it to ensure it was clever and always zigged when I thought it would zag. I was thinking a rising star artist like Nick Dragotta could draw something like this well. A sort of Sean Murphy meets Jock sensibility. All of this would be perfect on a company like Image who keep putting out good series after good series. What do you think of that idea? Pretty good right? – Javier R. from Brooklyn, Ny.

Javier,

That book sounds exactly like EAST OF WEST #1. It comes out this Wednesday. Please think of something more original.

Hello Matthew,

First of all, I love the column. You truly are the voice of a generation. I have a friend who thinks that all comics suck. What should I tell them? Vita A. from L.E.S., NY.

Hi Vita,

Thanks for the kind words. I get that a lot. First of all, are you sure this person is really your friend? It sounds like they are just hanging out with you to try and make you angry. That’s not what friendship is about, keep that in mind. Either way, you should give them JULIO’S DAY which is out today. Originally started in Love & Rockets vol. II but never completed until now, JULIO’S DAY is one of the more easily digestible while still brilliant works by Gilberto Hernandez. There are few folks alive or dead who will end up having either the massive impact or the stunning catalog in comics of either of Los Bros. Hernandez. While JULIO’S DAY may not go down as his most important work because it lacks the impressive scale of the Palomar stuff, it shouldn’t be overlooked. For a man who has found his career making epic sprawling stories, it is humbling and inspiring to see he can do the same thing in small doses as well. Give that to your “friend” and tell them to choke on it.

Hello Matthew,

Do you know what your problem is? – Anna P. from Seattle, Wa.

Anna,

Yup.

Dear Matthew,

Thanks for the column. It saved my life a few times. Or maybe it just felt that way. Anyway, I met this guy at a party recently and he seemed really great. He was really tall and good looking, wearing this psychedelic blue and yellow jumpsuit. He said he was a magician from another dimension and he did all sorts of strange tricks. He had an entourage of strange dwarves, catfaced men, and all sorts of odd characters around him. But then he said he had to leave because his biggest fan was in danger and he had to dimension hop and rescue them from the clutches of his arch nemesis. I don’t like getting in over my head but I really like him and want to see him again. Here’s the thing; I don’t know how to find him now? I am worried he is gone forever!- Rich W. from Long Island, Ny.

Hey Rich,

Good news/bad news here. The bad news first: none of that happened. You are having a weird flashback and need to sort that out. The good news: What you are describing sounds a lot like the mini-series Zaucer of Zilk. Z.O.Z. was a great and truly bizarre British psychedelic comic and has just been collected as THE COMPLETE ZAUCER OF ZILK. To any of my readers who want to feel like someone dosed them but you don’t want to end up babbling nonsense like crazy Rich over here I would strongly recommend this one. The British comic guys do no holds barred crazy better than anyone else and it is always a fun trip. Bright colors, weirdo plot twists, amazing characters, and only a passing grasp on reality makes for great comics.

Hiya Matthew,

Would you like a cashew? -Jean B. from Bronx, Ny.

Jean,

No thanks. Nuts are gross. Nothing personal.

Hey Matthew,

Great work with the column. Keep it up. I am writing because I’m in a weird situation. There is this person I know who I hang out with just to make them angry. I say things like “all comics suck” just to see what they say. Is this wrong? P.S. You are my favorite writer of all time. – Danny L. from Harlem, Ny

Hi Danny,

No, this definitely isn’t wrong. The whole point of having friends is to push their boundaries and get under their skin. Friendship should be a caustic and trying affair. Like prolonged exposure to lye, if it isn’t making your skin blister you aren’t doing it right. In the meantime you should read a book. Try B.P.R.D. VAMPIRE #1. It’s a new arc of B.P.R.D. so it will definitely be a fun book and it’s drawn by Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon aka the team behind Daytripper aka two of the best artists in comics. Go buy it in secret, read it in private, and tell your friend to she smells funny.

Hello Matthew,

Love the column so much. You are the greatest mind of our generation. I put you up there with Faulkner, Hemingway, Steinbeck, and Ellison as a defining voice of the American experience. Please don’t ever stop writing. Your words give my life meaning. Also, are there any good X-Men books out this week? Carly R. from Burlington, Vt.

Hi Carly,

Again, thanks for the kind words. Really flattering. Funny you should ask about X-Men books because ALL NEW X-MEN vol. 1 is out this week. I don’t hide my weirdo fondness for the work of Brian Bendis. His work on All New X-Men and Uncanny X-Men so far has been the absolute breakout of the Marvel Now relaunch and with good reason. These books fundamentally break down the X-Men to the basics of what the X-Men should be. Add to that actual character arcs and progression and you have what may end up being the best X-Men book in 25 years or more. Bold words but I don’t have to back them up because you can just read the book and see that I’m right. Hope that helps you Carly. Now quit smoking.

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Unkiedev’s Amazing Stuff #1

Unkiedev’s Amazing Stuff

Why haven’t I thought of this before? You guys must be super bored of reading my crumble-down, old timey column of words, thoughts, and comic book related highlights. THAT is why the Flash went to an alternative universe and got a glimpse at an ALL NEW, ALL DIFFERENT Unkiedev. A glimpse so startling that we have REBOOTED the entire Unkiedev’s Amazing Stuff universe!

No longer do I live in a smelly cave and constantly get assailed by ghouls, mummies, and woodland creatures! NOW I’m a sexy alien cat burglar who wears purple lingerie and totally makes-out with Batman! That is, when I’m not living in a smelly cave, getting goofed on by mummies and bears and crap.

THREE’S A CROWD

In fact there’s a bear in my cave now. He’s going on and on about how excited he is about Action Comics #3 and Detective Comics #3. I can see his point…Grant Morrison on Superman is never a book to skip, plus Batman is going to fight a villain who makes dolls out of his victim’s skin. Fun for all ages!

Still, I’m more interested in a number 2 book this week.

SUPERNATURAL #2, Brian Wood (W), Grant Bond (A), DC Comics

NOT part of the 52 that I’m aware of, though DC is pretty creative with its retcons. Supernatural is the DC published comic book based on the TV show of the same name. This is the third miniseries written about the show, all of which are sanctioned by the show’s creators and considered in-continuity stories.

Supernatural is good ole’ fun, the tale of roving monster hunters hanging out in bars, getting into fights with each other and the forces of evil. In this new miniseries, younger brother Sam is off in Scotland entangled in two sticky wickets, these being Monsters and Women.

S’good, fun stuff. Forbidden Planet might just have a few issues of #1 kicking around if you ask nicely. Or they might not. What do I know, I live in a cave! Continue reading

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REVIEWS: ‘Superman Secret Origin’, ‘Planetary’, ‘Captain America Reborn’

Time to catch up on a couple of reviews, this is a mix of a couple of books that came out this week, and last week.

Fantastic Four #571Pick of the week: Fantastic Four # 571 by Jonathan Hickman and Dale Eaglesham.  I’ve never been a Fantastic Four man, but this issue captured my imagination. From what I understand, Fantastic Four has always been about family and the impossible.  I don’t think it can get more imaginative or impossible that Reed Richards creates this machine that sends him to an extra dimensional  plane where the Reed Richards of parallel universes meet and help change everything.  In this issue our Reed helps kill Galactus, with an army of other Reeds armed with Ultimate Nullifiers.  He helps create a planet full of feed that will feed starving planets, and performs surgery on the universe.  Its a wild, beautiful look into Reed Richards and what he does to save everyone, including his relationship with Sue. To be honest, I wasn’t a Fantastic Four guy before, but I’m locked in from now on. Rating: 9.0

Superman Secret Origin #1Superman Secret Origin #1: This is like Geoff Johns doing his take on Smallville. I feel like every once in a while DC allows a writer to present their take on the origin of Superman.  Mark Waid did his take with the awesome Leinil Yu with Birthright, John Byrne did his seminal retake and now a couple years later, Johns gets his. Which is cool for people to come in and see Johns do this. Its just not that interesting, and doesn’t need to exist.  Though it does give a great explanation for the glasses, and that is kind of adorable. What can I say? I’m a softie. I don’t want to spoiler but that was pretty creative with the glasses handling the heat vision. Rating: 7.0.

Captain America Reborn # 3: Brubaker is a slow burn kind of guy.  He starts out Captain America Reborn #3 very slow, but usually by the end, you see that its worth it. His entire run on Captain America and Daredevil has been just like that, and those are easily the best superhero comics out there today. So there is no reason to lose faith on that when coming into this title.  However three issues in and we’re still on the same thing.  Steve Rogers is Quantum Leaping through his life and Norman Osborn is after Bucky, Falcon, Reed Richards and the rest. That’s been beaten like a dead drum for three issues and the only thing that has moved the story forward is it being revealed to the media that Sharon Carter was the second shooter. We don’t get any repercussions of that and its just the third straight issue of, you guessed it, Steve Rogers is Quantum Leaping and the Thunderbolts are out to kill Bucky and Black Widow.  Sorry, you gotta advance the story a little bit more than that for me. Butch Guice is nice to look at though. Rating: 5.0

Planetary #27 preview. This was in the back pages of Ex Machina #45.  It has the main characters talking about building a Time Machine, and in typical Planetary fashion, building the time machine that is already laced in popular culture. The one from H.G. Wells book, and also my favorite sci fi novel ever.  Time travel, and especially interpretations on Wells’s book, has always tickled my stomach.  Both amaze me even to this day.  So the fact that one of the best books ever written and drawn tackling something in regards to Wells’ Time Machine is something I can’t wait for. Planetary #27, the final issue hits stands Oct. 2.

With Ex Machina ending and the final issue of Planetary coming out, I can’t help but say those are the last two books from Wildstorm that I still read.  So…I’ll be interested to see what Wildstorm does when these two books end.

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The (Friday) Walk of Shame #3.

We apologize for the lack of a Walk of Shame for last week, there wasn’t much shame to have regardless, as there was a ton of nothing to read last week. So without further ado, here we have our third issue of THE WALK OF SHAME with Jeff Ayers and yours truly.

***

DAVE: I’m about halfway through LOCKE & KEY vol. 1, and I have to say this DCD369189book is completely brilliant.  Bode, that kid, holy shit, I haven’t read better characterization of a kid that age since Vaughan was on RUNAWAYS. That moment between he and his mother while he’s fishing for treasure about the homework assignment where he did a comic about his father’s death was completely heart-wrenching and beautiful.  I mean, Hill earned that Eisner nod on that page alone.

JEFF: And Gabriel Rodriguez’s art is ideally suited for the story. It’s somehow gritty and brutal, and often unrelentingly tense, but he can balance it out with tenderness and nice characterization. Draws great facial expressions. He’s got a real passion for the story and it shows. He also worked on an adaptation of Clive Barker’s Great and Secret Show, which I also dug.

Have you read any of Joe’s prose? His novel Heart-Shaped Box and short story collection 20th Century Ghosts… They’re pretty terrific, too.

The guy’s really talented.

Absolutely, Ty’s expression when his cousin says to him about being more famous than famous people now was detailed perfectly. The dead stare on Sam’s face is perfectly indicitive of a killer without emotion. I can’t say I’ve ever seen an artist who matches up Hill’s characterization with his line work.  The looks on Duncan and Kinsey’s face when Bode tells that Owl/Echo joke. Totally brilliant.

That’s something not often discussed- comics stories best told through facial expressions. AKA The Steve Dillon Experience. Preacher would have been nothing if, say, Jim Lee or any other action oriented comicker took a crack at it.

Yeah. Its been a long time since we’ve had something like that.  What other books do you think work like that?

Allred’s Madman, to an extent. Hewlett’s Tank Girl. Jaime’s Love& Rockets. Tons of books are made by the artist’s facial expressions skillz…

What did you end up getting this week?

Picked up the Irredeemable trade, and the subsequent 5th ish (a steal at 99 cents), the Pax Romana trade because I have a Jonathan Hickman man-crush, and um, ah, um, um Star Trek Alien Spotlight on Q… cuz I’m a dork.

You?

Oh, and of course the obligatory Wednesday Comics.

Picked up: Iron Man, Deadpool: Merc with a mouth, World of New Krypton and Locke and key.  Yeah that Pax Romana shit is so ground-breaking.  Hickman has really done something to change the style comics design.  I got the first couple of issues of Pax but missed on the final few, I wanted to pick it up but thought it was too many trades on the day.

Was a huuuuge week for nice books. My pockets can’t keep up.

There was also that new TMNT reprint. 30 bucks, but it’s sooo sexy.

Right, yeah, I saw that.  Really beautiful. You know what I just noticed I’m watching DEXTER and that kid who played Doomsday on SMALLVILLE plays the the suspected serial killer stalking Dexter.  He was terrible on Smallville but he is so creepy good on this its awesome. Ever watch Dexter?

Love it. Fantastic show. Never read the books it’s based on, but been meaning to.

Yeah, the books sound great if its anything like this.  This is a brilliant show.  What did you like the most from this week?

Michael C. Hall. That guy’s fantastic. What’d I like most. Um. There’s a lot of books out this week, but I got the most enjoyment out of…. the new Q Star Trek issue. I hate being so honest. I have the Q Virus!!!

Jesus. Why?!

Because that’s how I roll. And I haven’t read every book that came out this week to find something to trump the Q. Love that character.

***

That concludes the third issue of THE WALK OF SHAME.  Tune in next week for another issue.

 

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