Tagged: Jill Thompson

10 Things I Learned About Heroescon

Around this time last year, I got a (possibly drunk) tweet from a friend, a North Carolina local, yelling at me for not being at Heroescon. I sited that I couldn’t attend due to cost/other commitments, but if the show was interesting enough, I’d make an attempt to go. Word of mouth, promises of the best BBQ and an exciting guest list won me over quickly, so instead of attending Dragon*Con this year, I flew down to NC to give Heroescon a shot. Here’s 10 things I’ve discovered from attending the show, and some photos of my experience. Spoiler warning: I really liked it.

10) Heroescon con is a LEGIT comics convention. That much is obvious, but by legit I mean the guests/artists in the alley are STRICTLY comics professionals. No wrestlers/voice actors/b-list celebrities. Which is refreshing. Don’t get me wrong, it’s cool when Reed Pop! snags an Avengers or Doctor Who related guest for NYCC or C2E2, but I rather talk scripts with Matt Fraction, then try to awkwardly ignore former wrestle Virgil for the hundredth time. Dude has not aged gracefully.

9) It is fairly impossibly to eat healthy in Charlotte, which sucks if you’re a vegan/vegetarian. But it’s also way easier/cheaper to score food in and around the convention center. Also Bonjangles was a place I may have eaten at every day of the con, and still have zero regrets about because their chicken and biscuits are amazing. I’ve also not checked my weight upon return from NC, fearing the results.

8) “You may not touch Stan Lee, but Stan may touch you.” The first part was was actually said to those who signed up for photos/autographs with the living legend, but the later was a unspoken truth. At least according to several of my female friends who met Stan the Man on Saturday. However his behavior was more amusing than offensive, which is nice to see, as he’s been married for several decades, and I would like to see it stay that way.

7) Speaking of men behaving badly, the rumors of Southern Gentlemen are greatly exaggerated. While I was the appointed purse/swag carrier for my friend cosplaying Black Widow, I noticed several men “sniping” photos of her. “Sniping” is the term where photos are taken of a cosplayer, usually from behind, without their constant, as said photos are usually of the girl’s back end. Believe it or not, cosplayers WILL poses for photos 9 out of 10 times when asked (not of their asses though). Also please, don’t ask any stupid questions. It’s awkward as hell when you come up to me and ask “Did you LET her out of the house dressed like that”, when “she” isn’t my wife, and this is the year 2012, where that sort of crap isn’t tolerated.

6) Using that to segway into a cosplay discussion, it’s worth noting that the number of cosplayers at the convention was quite small compared to some of the bigger shows I’ve been to. Although amongst the dozens of Black Widows, Hawkeyes, and Harley Quinns, there were some more obscure characters, like Clea (Doctor Strange’s ex), Ray Palmer, and Madam Viper. I have several friends from the Superhero Costuming Forum who invited me along for their photoshoot. The event brought out about 50 cosplayers in total, which is small compared to what they usually get at say Dragon*Con. Still, there’s some solid stuff in there, which is always nice to see. Feel free to guess where I am in the photo.

5) The type of panels you’ll see at Heroescon vary greatly from the ones you see at SDCC or NYCC. No one is plugging the “New 52” or “AvX” there. No, you’ll get Marv Wolfman and George Perez discussing their legendary “Teen Titans” run, the Immonens sharing stories on how they worked together. And Matt Fraction discussing his work on “Thor” and “Iron Man” with the likes of Bob Layton and Walt Simonson. Also a “War Rocket Ajax” podcast recording with Matt Wilson and a slightly hung over Chris Sims, in which Ponies, board games and Jason Stratham were all topics of discussion. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Clone Chores

This has been the easiest column to write of my long career…because I didn’t write it! OR DID I?! No, I did not, but my CLONE did! That’s right, in order to better multitask I have developed a clone-o-matic so that all of my necessary daily tasks (sweeping up the cave, writing my columns, eating, etc.) can be performed while I engage in weightier pursuits…like finally finishing Zelda II: The Adventures of Link. That game is tough!

So let’s just review this document my clone has passed in…we’ll call him CLunkiedev. *Puts on reading glasses, clears throat* Ahem.

GOOD FOR YOUR EYES


Well, I already have to step in to editorialize. Clunkie’s written here “Darhrazz 8” and then a sort of squiggle. Due to me taking this particular clone out of the tank a little early his hands aren’t strictly speaking hands…he can grip but his nailless fingers are sort of boneless and stumpy. I think IT is trying to recommend Dark Horse Presents #8 which, on top of some great new stuff from Brian Wood and Howard Chaykin promises to have a Hellboy B.P.R.D. tie-in story. It’s a good book to cover.

Speaking of which, Clunkiedev has scribbled a sort of moist rectangle with a Superman symbol, the number 6 and a big “X” through it. I think It is as disappointed in the cover to Action Comics #6 as I am…sort of a green and purple blob in which Superman is stuck as though in a Japanese tentacle manga. It reminds me of Clunkie’s forehead…see eyelashes are really hard to clone, and they came out all…never mind. AC #6 has a lousy cover, but I’m sure Grant Morrison’s superlative writing on these Super-books will be top notch.

Two covers that leap off the shelf are Fear Itself The Fearless #8 and The Twelve #9! Fear Itself The Fearless is the spin off series from last summer’s Fear Itself event. Good  Marvel fun. The cover, however, is the best Art Adams has to give! Amazing perspective, detail and poses as only Adams can deliver. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

Department of Redundancy Dept

Three DC books out this week can sum up where the comic book industry started, where it went and where it is going. To whit: Justice League of America #58, Brightest Day Aftermath #1 of 3, and Flashpoint: Kid Flash #1 of 3.

Superhero comics became the driving genre because they were amazingly ungrounded power plays starring glorious yet identifiable gods and goddesses.  Justice League of America #58 has a bunch of highly attractive lads and lasses in skin-tight costumes fighting celestial powers to save the entire universe. Dang! That sure beats reading about Prince Valiant or Mary Worth, now doesn’t it?

Every party has a pooper, and the Silver/Golden age of comics had a big one: repetition. It’s hard to evoke suspense about saving the Universe when you know the comic is solicited for monthly books from now till kingdom come. I think Superman is going to save the day…without a Universe what will they put in the next issue?

Enter Alan Moore, the genius behind Watchmen who figured out that the enemy within is always more compelling than the enemy without, and that truth is ALWAYS stranger than fiction. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

Dispatch from an Alternate Universe

By Unkiedev

There is not a single problem that can befall man nor beast that cannot be resolved through the awesome powers of this week’s new comic books. S’true!

Let’s pretend you are a wasp and you’re way behind building you new hive. Not only does Doom Patrol #20 feature bizarre characters written by the incomparable Keith Giffen, but you could eat it, digest it and regurgitate it out to make a wood pulp perfect for your queen’s new chambers! The same goes for Superboy #5, which features a race to the finish between Superboy Connor Kent and Kid Flash! Wowee!

“Unkiedev,” you might now declare, “You are a glue-sniffing fool. I am neither NOT a wasp. This solution will not suit, sir! I am, however, living in an alternative universe which has been taken over by Zombie hoards and trying to date a half mutated hippopotamus.” Continue reading

Post to Twitter

SDCC: Eisner Award Winners 2010

The Eisner Awards were presented Friday evening in concurrence with Comic-Con International at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront.  Onstage guests included the cast of the imminent Scott Pilgrim film, Thomas Jane, Ben Garant (Reno 911), voice actor Phil Lamarr (Futurama, Samurai Jack). The event was MC’d by Maurice LaMarche (“The Brain,” from Pinky & The Brain and notable veteran of many other cartoons).

There were also some real life comic creators there, presenting awards to their  peers, the likes of which included Chris Claremont, Milo Manara(!), James Robinson, Berkeley Breathed, Peter Bagge, James Sturm, and Jillian Tamaki.

The works below are linked to either the item on the FPNYC webstore or the winner’s homepage where applicable.

Best Short Story
“Urgent Request,” by Gene Luen Yang and Derek Kirk Kim, in The Eternal Smile (First Second)

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot)
Captain America #601: “Red, White, and Blue-Blood,” by Ed Brubaker and Gene Colan (Marvel)

Best Continuing Series
The Walking Dead, by Robert Kirkman and Charles Adlard (Image)

Best Limited Series or Story Arc
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young (Marvel)

Best New Series
Chew, by John Layman and Rob Guillory (Image)

Best Publication for Kids
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz hardcover, by L. Frank Baum, Eric Shanower and Skottie Young (Marvel)

Beasts of Burden, winner Best Painter, Best Publication for Teens
Beasts of Burden, winner Best Painter, Best Publication for Teens

Best Publication for Teens
Beasts of Burden, by Evan Dorkin and Jill Thompson (Dark Horse)

Best Humor Publication
Scott Pilgrim, Vol. 5: Scott Pilgrim vs. the Universe, by Bryan Lee O’Malley (Oni Press)

Best Anthology
Popgun, Vol. 3, edited by Mark Andrew Smith, D. J. Kirkbride and Joe Keatinge (Image)

Best Digital Comic
Sin Titulo, by Cameron Stewart

DCD390415
A Drifting Life, winner Best Reality-Based Work, Best U.S. Edition of Foreign Material (Asia)

Best Reality-Based Work
A Drifting Life, by Yoshihiro Tatsumi (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Adaptation from Another Work
Richard Stark’s Parker: The Hunter, adapted by Darwyn Cooke (IDW Publishing)

Best Graphic Album — New
Asterios Polyp, by David Mazzucchelli (Pantheon)

Best Graphic Album — Reprint
Absolute Justice, by Alex Ross, Jim Krueger and Doug Braithewaite (DC Comics)

Best Archival Collection/Project — Strips
Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 1, by Berkeley Breathed, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW Publishing)

Best Archival Collection/Project — Comic Books
The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures deluxe edition, by Dave Stevens, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW Publishing)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
The Photographer, by Emmanuel Guibert, Didier Lefèvre and Frédéric Lemerier (First Second)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material — Asia
A Drifting Life, by Yoshihiro Tatsumi (Drawn & Quarterly)

Best Writer
Ed Brubaker, Captain America, Daredevil, Marvels Project (Marvel) Criminal, Incognito (Icon)

asterios_polyp
Asterios Polyp, winner Best Writer/Artist, Best Graphic Album, Best Lettering

Best Writer/Artist
David Mazzucchelli, Asterios Polyp (Pantheon)

Best Writer/Artist–Nonfiction
Joe Sacco, Footnotes in Gaza (Metropolitan/Holt)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
J. H. Williams III, Detective Comics (DC Comics)

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
Jill Thompson, Beasts of Burden (Dark Horse); Magic Trixie and the Dragon (HarperCollins Children’s Books)

Best Cover Artist
J. H. Williams III, Detective Comics (DC Comics)

Best Coloring
Dave Stewart, Abe Sapien, B.P.R.D., The Goon, Hellboy, Solomon Kane, Umbrella Academy, Zero Killer (Dark Horse); Detective Comics (DC Comics); Luna Park (Vertigo)

Best Lettering
David Mazzucchelli, Asterios Polyp (Pantheon)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
The Comics Reporter, produced by Tom Spurgeon

Best Comics-Related Book
The Art of Harvey Kurtzman: The Mad Genius of Comics, by Denis Kitchen and Paul Buhle (Abrams ComicArts)

Absoloute Justice, winner Best Graphic Album (reprint), Best Publication Design
Absoloute Justice, winner Best Graphic Album (reprint), Best Publication Design

Best Publication Design
Absolute Justice, designed by Curtis King and Josh Beatman (DC Comics)

Will Eisner Spirit of Comics Retailer Award
Vault of Midnight, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Hall of Fame
• Burne Hogarth
• Bob Montana
• Steve Gerber
• Dick Giordano
• Michael Kaluta
• Mort Weisinger

Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award
Jeannie Schulz

Bill Finger Award for Achievement in Comic Book Writing
Otto Binder, Gary Friedrich

Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award
Marian Churchland (Beast)

Post to Twitter

Eisner-Winners Evan Dorkin, Jill Thompson @ Animal Planet

The Daily Treat, a blog for Animal Planet, one of the Discovery Channel’s other networks (sheesh, that was a handful) has a keen interview up with Evan Dorkin (Milk & Cheese, Dork) and Jill Thompson (Scary Godmother, The Invisibles) covering their new miniseries from Dark Horse, “Beasts of Burden.”

beastsEvan: The series is about a group of neighborhood dogs and a stray cat that come together to protect their town from the supernatural.  The town is apparently cursed, and the people living there aren’t attentive enough to notice anything is wrong, at least not yet.  So it’s up to these pets to do what they can, with the help of two wise dogs who are training them in the occult.  So far they’ve dealt with a haunted doghouse, a coven of witches and their black cat familiars, a pack of zombie dogs, and a werewolf.

The new series spins out of their Eisner-winning short story that appeared in The Book of Hauntings from a few years back, and having read the recently released issue #1, I’m glad to report this new series has a lot of promise so far.

The entire interview can be read here.

Post to Twitter