Tagged: indie comics

01_HEATHEN_CVR_V1_Fowler_Front_SR-830x1276

Meet The New Mighty Viking In HEATHEN #1

You will fear her name!

Do you like Thor? Northlanders? Red Sonja or Conan? Do you want to see kick ass warriors? Maybe you’re a proponent for strong female lead characters in comics? Are you burned out on superheroes and want some good old fashioned demon battles and talking horses? Here’s the new series to scratch all of your itches but careful, this self-proclaimed heathen might draw a little blood.

At Forbidden Planet we like to root for the underdog. There are publishers big enough to make sure you know every character’s name, origin(s), and costume tweak. Then there are the indie companies who may not have the budget or the name recognition but what they do have are badass books. Heathen #1 is one such book.

Aydis is a on a mission to kill a god. Well, she’s on a mission to end the reign of a tyrant god-king called Odin. Killing him may or may not be possible. Aydis is all the things I mentioned earlier. She’s a viking badass warrior. She’s also an outcast, a heathen, and a friend to talking horses. Except her talking horse has a cool name, Saga (yeah they did). Aydis battles demons. She takes on crazy cool monsters. And yes, she’s a woman. She’s been born at a time where war is prevalent, suffering is universal, and women are treated as less than. This is her story as told by Natasha Alterici. It’s not the beginning but it is where you will join her journey if you give this new series a chance. We heartily recommend that you do.

Post to Twitter

god-country-2-cover

Gods Come To Texas in GOD COUNTRY #2

Finally, the next chapter of this Gods among us epic is here!

In case you missed it (if you did, go get a copy of God Country #1 immediately), one of the best new series has its next issue coming out this New Comic Book Day. It’s rare when a book this good comes along. Do you like Southern Bastards? Thor? Epic mythological tales with heartbreaking family drama? Then you’ve no excuse not picking up God Country #2 this week.

Donny Cates (Buzzkill, The Ghost Fleet) might just be making a cult favorite. In the first issue we learned some of the deep and mythology busting secrets of Emmett Quinlan and his family. Having returned home to take care of his aging and mentally deteriorating father, Emmett was putting his wife and child through the ringer. His wife had had enough of Emmett’s dad’s cruelty and Emmett’s stubbornness to put his father in a home where he could be cared for properly. For some reason, still to be further explored, Emmett couldn’t bare to “give up” on his dad. Meanwhile, a twister was getting set to touch down. Little did we know this was no ordinary tornado and that it carried within it the key to unlocking mysteries of Emmett and his father.

After the amazing reveal at the end of the first issue, Emmett will continue to attempt to rebuild his family in the wake of the storm that broke them. Meanwhile, something otherworldly screams through the sky under a banner of war. The Gods have touched down in Texas and they are not going to leave empty handed. Why are you still reading?!?Buy your copy and get in on this at the ground floor.

Not sure if you can make it Wednesday? Sign up for a subscription box and put it on your pull list! This is one journey you don’t want to be left behind for.

Post to Twitter

Morgan’s Mini-comic Mayhem* – Sawdust Press Edition

* Not actually written by Morgan

Former FP employee, Morgan Pielli, used to dive into our exhaustive catalog of minis and zines to let you know what was worth reading from the seemingly-daunting indie section. A primer, if you will, of the kind of treasures you’ll find there.

Sadly, Morgan had to return to his home planet town. But we carry on in his totally-not-an-alien name with these reviews. This week we’re focusing on the talented folks at SAWDUST PRESS.

BLOOD ROOT is an ongoing anthology of comic shorts that feels like a fresh take on The Twilight Zone. Each story features a new creative team, with diverse ideas that range anywhere from a family dinner gone wrong to the seeming-safety of a girl’s bedroom all the way to a post-apocalyptic South Korea. There are already three volumes out to read. Take my word, they’re all worth it. But, if you have any doubts, come on by and start with the first story, THE FAMILY THAT EATS TOGETHER by  James Neish and I guarantee you’ll be hooked.

Meanwhile, if you’re looking for a cute little gift for your nature-loving friend, Sawdust’s FIELD GUIDE series is perfect. Sharing some of the adorable intricacies of the DEATHFACE MUSHROOM or the COMMON LEAFBUG as imagined by Shing Yin Khor is a surprisingly effective way to get someone to fall in love with you, or just fall in love with insects yourself, ya big weirdo. And if, let’s say, you fumbled on Valentine’s Day, they might not be a bad way to get yourself outta trouble.

Finally, there’s the CENTER FOR OTHERWORLD SCIENCE, another creation of Shin Yin Khor’s. This time it’s the misadventures of a group of scientists studying the increasingly improbable secrets held beneath our planet’s surface. Unsurprisingly, adorable (albeit giant) bugs factor heavily, as does an ongoing love story between two lady scientists. What could be better? And there’s a whole three comics out already with more on the way.

 

Post to Twitter

Morgan Pielli’s Pile of Minis: I’ll Take You to the Moon & Araby

After a long hiatus, Morgan Pielli’s Pile of Mini’s returns. And just in time to have my heart broken by this weeks batch of comics! Yes, the theme for the week is love lost, and so let’s pull up a pint of Neapolitan and dig right in.

I’ll Take You to the Moon & Leave You There vol. 1 by Skuds McKinley

McKinley’s I’ll Take You… is a personal anthology of oft-surreal vignettes, some of which seem quietly autobiographical while others are more fanciful and fantastic. The drawing styles vary from piece to piece, and while the McKinley struggles with some draftsmanship challenges here and there (such as drawing the back of peoples’ heads distractingly flat), his art is filled with energy and vitality. He has a clear love for obsessive detail, as evidenced by his joyful depictions of technological greeble and fleshy alien surfaces. While this creates a lively environment for his stories, it sometimes results in muddled framing.

One unifying theme throughout this book is an unusual stylistic choice: most of McKinley’s human characters wear some sort of animal mask, generally in the form of a small rubber animal nose worn over their own. I’m not certain what this is intended to convey. The characters that wear these don’t always seem particularly guarded or hidden. I suspect there is a deeper meaning, but it is one that went over my head.

Of the stories in this collection, two of my favorites were “No Pill Today” and “This Is How We Destroyed Each Other.”

“No Pill Today” is a frank depiction of depression and anxiety. It does a great job conveying the dread that, though we can banish these negative feelings with medication, we are perhaps banishing a piece of ourselves as well. This story feels the most realistic and emotionally raw, and will likely resonate with those who suffer similarly.

“This is How We Destroyed Each Other” by Skuds and Dan is the best story in the collection. It is drawn with a clean, clear line that is not competing with unnecessary stylistic flourishes. The story builds up its lovers’ shared ecstasy to a level that forebodes a devastating plummet. It serves as a perfect deconstruction of love’s blossom and whithering, and is both painful and elegantly told.

Ed Choy Draws James Joyce: “Araby” from Dubliners by Eel Choy (FKA Ed Choy)

Confession: I haven’t read anything by James Joyce. Not because I haven’t the interest; more that I haven’t had the time. And for this, I hang my head in shame.

However, this DID allow me (for better or for worse) to go into Ed Choy’s Araby without any preconceived notions or residual images of Dubliners’ characters in my head. What I found was a charming vignette about the unrequited puppy love that many of us experience as children. Joyce does a fantastic job of depicting that sense of deep obsession that comes at a time when we are too young to understand it properly. Choy’s loose, animated drawing style lends an added emotional depth to the story. He is also adept at breaking down Joyce’s sometimes-dense prose into more easily-digested moments. Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The reviews for GUP #1 are pouring in.

Resident comic guy Josh Weisbrod’s first published work GUP made an epic splash on the indie comic scene recently.

Comic Book Resources says… “Weirdness… weird… it has a weird charm to it.”

Josh’s response… “Yeah weird is pretty much what I was going for, as long as you enjoy feeling weird”

Post to Twitter

Philly Alt Con this Sunday!!

If you’re in the area, come by and show your support for the indie comics scene at this years Philly Alt Con! Doors open at noon on the 14th! Check out the site for more details.I’ll be there with my series  Indestructible Universe Quarterly! Stop by my very red table and say “hi!”

Post to Twitter