Tagged: Gerry Duggan

Review: Batman Volume 6: Graveyard Shift

51hNXab4FEL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Batman Volume 6: Graveyard Shift

Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo/ Marguerite Bennett/Andy Kubert/James Tynion IV/Alex Maleev/Andy Clarke/Dustin Nguyen/ Wes Craig/Matteo Scalera/Gerry Duggan

DC Comics, $24.99

With the first 5 volumes of the Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo run on Batman, we the reader got a series of cohesive and quite excellent stories by the same team of creators. Those who have been reading the book monthly have had a different experience, as there has been several issues that have interrupted this run with some guest creative teams. Volume 6 is a collection of those issues, which range back to as far back as 2012 and as recent as 2014. Needless to say, this book is a bit disjointed,  with some of the material dated already.

One of the biggest things to occur during the Snyder/Capullo era was the death of Damian Wayne, which occurred over in the Grant Morrison/Chris Burnham Batman Inc. title. With it not happening in Batman proper, trade waiters now finally get to see that event addressed by Snyder and several other creators in a few different stories. The downside of that is that Damian was already revived earlier this year (with an ongoing set to debut soon), so said stories kind of lose their impact. It’s even worse if you’ve only been reading this incarnation in trade, as there’s zero explanation as to how Damian passed. There are also 2 Year Zero-era tales included, which is odd for several reasons. The biggest one being that Year Zero was already collected in Volumes 4 & 5, and would have made more sense being included there than in this volume. Finally, the last story collected is tied into the recently concluded Batman: Eternal, which I feel would have been suited for one of those trades more so than this one.

BM_19_300-005_HD.480x480-75So while this book feels scatterbrained and uneven, it also looks fairly sharp. Greg Capullo is joined by a ton of talented artists. Andy Kubert, Dustin Nguyen, Alex Maleev, Andy Clarke and Matteo Scalera are some of the more notable contributors and while their styles are all wildly different, they all bring their A game. It’s a little jarring to see different artists tackle the Gotham envisioned by Greg Capullo at first, but these veteran artists contributions are great none the less. It helps that Scott Snyder oversees if not straight up writes a lot of the guest stories, so the tone feels consistent throughout the collection.

Joining Snyder on writing duties are two of his former students, James Tynion IV and Marguerite Bennett. The Snyder penned material is obviously the strongest, and Tylion and Bennet aren’t exactly slouches either. Similar to Snyder, both writers mix horror and action scenes well, although none of their dialogue ever hits as hard as Synder’s does. It’s almost a bit of a unfair comparison, as neither of those two have Greg Capullo to work with. The story written by Gerry Duggan is antiquate: not the best Batman story in this volume, but nothing wrong with it, and it looks great. Matteo Scalera was a perfect fit to draw a Batman story, and his stylistic take on the character is fantastic.

Batman Volume 6: The Graveyard Shift is a weird anthology of sorts. The Snyder/Capullo issues are great, and anyone who’s dug their work in the past won’t be disappointed. The other issues require some knowledge of the going-ons in other DC comics, but are enjoyable none the less. It’s not the best collection of Bat-Material in this run, but it’s a fun little collection of stories that will hold you over until Endgame is reprinted. A shame it’s not as accessible as the past collections have, but that’s not really on the creators as it is on whoever decide to collect the book like this.

 

 

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Troy’s Toys but with Comics: Seeing Purple Edition

Happy Whatever you’re celebrating Forbidden Planet Faithful! Let it be known that I’m writing this article instead of playing several Blizzard video games because I love you (and money).

Hawkeye_vs._Deadpool_Vol_1_3_TextlessHawkeye Vs Deadpool #3

Gerry Duggan/Matteo Lolli/Jacopo Camangni/Cristiane Peter

Marvel $3.99

If you’ve been reading this blog at any point over the last 2 years, you’ll know that I’m VERY protective of reading the Hawkeyes when not penned by Matt Fraction. Luckily for me, Hawkguy Clint Barton has been handled incredibly well over in the various Avengers books, and Hawkeye Kate Bishop has only appeared in Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie‘s excellent Young Avengers run.

Kate is also our narrator in this issue of Hawkeye Vs Deadpool and series writer Gerry Duggan absolutely nails her voice. Duggan balances Kate’s youth plus her relationship with Clint exceptionally well, with some nods to “recent” events over in the Fraction/Aja series. Her interactions with Deadpool are hilarious, and it’s fun to see Katie-Kate interact with the greater Marvel universe.  Duggan’s Deadpool is still a blast to read, and bouncing him off of Hawkeye Kate keeps the book fresh.

Art wise, the duo of Matteo Lolli & Jacopo Camagni remain a great fit for this title. Aside from the amount of teeth in Deadpool’s mouth being inconsistent, their expressive and clean art is perfect for this book’s kooky antics. They also capture modern NYC well, doing the city justice and making the some of the more modern reference work. They’re also great at capturing the humor in Duggan’s script, especially as seen on the final page of the book. Apparently Queen jokes are in fashion in comics this year.

Deadpool Vs Hawkeye continues to show what sort of fun one can have with a Marvel team up. Great visuals, solid jokes and good character work justify this book’s existence, and I would recommend it to anyone with any investment in the Hawkeyes and or Deadpool. AKA me.

Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_3_29_TextlessUncanny X-men #29

Brian Michael Bendis/Chris Bachalo/ 5 inkers/2 colorists

Marvel $3.99

Ambitious best describes this incredibly dense issue of Uncanny X-men. Brian Michael Bendis is already balancing several plot lines with this current arc, and the addition of a few last minute Macguffins may take this book into a new direction. It’s a bold decision, especially when Bendis is balancing a number of plotlines with a large cast as is, but hopefully he can pull it off. Time will only tell.

Art wise, this book isn’t a mess per say, but having 2 different colorists work on the same penciler is jarring. Chris Bachalo usually looks best when he’s coloring his own work, so Antonio Fabela and Jose Villarrubia aren’t doing his much justice. One of their pallets are too light, maker the book look paler and more retro than it needs to be, while the other is much brighter, but does some weird inkless coloring with several characters hairs and fur. To be fair, that almost may be on one of the several inkers, it’s hard to place blame.

While the art is a bit inconstant, the stakes are certainly raised in the penultimate (I think) chapter of The Last Will and Testament of Charles Xavier. Hopefully the story will stick it’s landing, because while the creative team has done some good work on this book, there’s still a chance that it’s gotten too bloated for it’s own good.

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Troy’s Toys, but with Comics: Purple is the new Black

MISSING: Intro. Last scene: When I didn’t have a lot of words about comics to vomit upon my computer.

Hawkeye_vs._Deadpool_Vol_1_2_TextlessHawkeye/Deadpool #2

Gerry Duggan/Matteo Lolli/Jacopo Camangi

Marvel $3.99

With the Fraction/Aja’s Hawkeye series continuously hit with delays, I’ve had to turn to the wonderful Secret Avengers and this mini series for my Clint Barton and Kate Bishop fix. As luck would have it, I couldn’t have chosen 2 better books to do so, and oddly enough, book both has a healthy amount of Deadpool in them.

Not that I’ve pointed out Marvel’s lack of original content (KIDDING), I should talk about this comic that I have purchased.  This issue, tying into recent events in both  Deadpool and Amazing Spider-Man,  sees our team try to set a trap for the baddies, and it goes as well as one would an except a Hawkguy conceived plan to go. Also the Hawkeyes learn just exactly how weird and complex Deadpool’s life can get, and video games are played. Other things goes down too, but those are spoilers, so it’s probably bess that I don’t discuss them.

Gerry Duggan, who co-writes Deadpool’s monthly series, draws upon both characters histories, bringing up some more obscure elements of their careers for hilarious results. I was not expecting a reference to the beloved Joe Kelly era Deadpool book, nor a discussion about the fate of Hawkeye’s Sky-Cycle. The book also continues to reference a few visual gags from the Hawkeye on-going, and they continue to remain fun little nods to that book.

Matteo Lolli gets some help from Jacopo Camagni on the art side of things, and it’s certainly something I welcomed. I was a fan of Camangi’s work on last year’s Longshot mini series, and he fits the book well. His Kate Bishop looks like a young woman, and his softer, round faces and exaggerated body language help sell a lot of the book’s humor. The two artists’ styles are similar enough to tell a cohesive story, but you can also appreciate what each brings to the book as well without preferring one to another. And the colors complete the package, making this title long for a Hawkeye/Deadpool animated series that we’ll never get.

For a mini I was willing to write off as a cash grab, I’ve been having a blast reading Hawkeye Vs Deadpool. It’s a fun hero team up/fight book that looks great, is good for a few laughs, and helps fans realize how much growth these two popular characters have gone through thanks to their respected creative teams.

 

Batgirl-36Batgirl #36

Cameron Stewart/Brenden Fletcher/Babs Tarr/Maris Wicks

Dc $2.99

Batgirl’s 2014 soft relaunch continues to impress, with a strong follow up issue to the current creative team’s debut. In this issue, Barbara Gordon’s supporting cast continues to grow, with several new characters introduced, as well as a throw down with a pair of cosplayers turn contract killers on stolen high-tech motorcycles. As someone who loves Barbara Gordon as a character, having her throw down with murderous cosplayers isn’t needed for me to buy your comics, but I appreciate you targeting my tastes.

Judging from what I just wrote, it’s safe to assume that I liked this comic. And I don’t mean to take away from writer Brenden Fletcher, who’s contributions to this book are crucial, but a lot of this book worked for me thanks to the talents of  artists Cameron Stewart, Babs Tarr and colorist Maris Wicks. While Burnside is very much a new part of Gotham, the artists really did an excellent job of fleshing out the city and it’s various locales, making it a very believable place. Tarr using a number of fashion blogs for her character designs also helps sell the city, which definitely looks like part of Brooklyn I’ve been to recently.

Maris Wicks’ colors are fantastic. The book definitely pops out thanks to his bright palette and blends well with Tarr’s kinetic pencils, especially when it comes to the book’s climatic fight scenes. I wouldn’t go as far to say it’s the best looking book on the market, but it definitely sticks out on the shelf, and yes,  looks great. And Fletcher’s dialogue is sharp, smart, and manages to tug at the hear at times. It’s a creative team that meshes together well, giving the reader one hell of comics experience

Batgirl continues to be a title I didn’t know I wanted, but glad I now have. It’s been awhile since I’ve been this invested in Barbara Gordon’s life, and this creative team is already batting (not a pun, I swear) .1000 after 2 strong issues. Batgirl is giving my pull list a run for being my current favorite title, which says a lot given how strong comics have been as whole in 2014.

 

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Troy’s Toys but with Comics: Big week was big part1

Oh snap, it’s a two part review article for this week! I pulled a whopping 5 books , as well as a few trades, so expect ALL COMICS ALL THE TIME articles for the next 2 weeks. Yeah I know, that’s kind of business as usual for me, but I’m choosing to do that over word- vomiting over the release of TWO new Cyclops action figures, so pretend it’s special this time around.

I’ve divided the books up as the following: Comics that cost $5 and comics that don’t cost $5. We’ll be looking at the $5 books first (which unsurprisingly are both Marvel books), because…well because I said so dammit.

detail Hawkeye vs Deadpool #0

Gerry Duggan/Matteo Lolli/Cristiane Peter

Marvel $4.99

I’ll be honest, this  book was a tough sell for me when it was initially announced. I haven’t bought a straight-up Deadpool book in years, and I tend to be very weary of books starring Hawkeye not written by Matt Fraction or Ales Kot. The $5 price tag certainly did help things either, and I figured that is it was good, trade waiting it would be a valid option.

HOWEVER, after flipping through the first issue of said at the shop, I ended up liking what I saw and decided to take a chance on it. And you know what, I’m glad it did, but this book hit me in all the right ways. Gerry Duggan has proven he can tell a good Deadpool story plenty of times in the proper Deadpool series, and while Matteo Lolli is no David Aja, his art definitely works for this story.

 

4063285-hawkvsdp2014000_int2-page-002The plot summary is as following: it’s Halloween night, and Deadpool and some folk familiar to both books are out trick or treating in a certain Avenger’s building. One of Hawkguy’s tenants has got himself in some trouble, so now Wade and Clint have some super heroing to do. The only problem is that don’t necessary want to work together as bro,s bros.

That by the way, brings me to my sole issue with this comic. We’ve seen Deadpool and Hawkeye work together in the past, last year in A+X, and currently in Secret Avengers. I may be playing the role of TURBO NERD here, but there’s material currently being published ( Thunderbolts, Hawkeye, the just mentioned Secret Avengers) thatclashes with this book. Maybe it with all make sense once those stories are all told, but only time will tell.

Continuity-nerd-issues aside, the book itself is fun. Both Lolli and Duggan obviously have some experience with Deadpool with past works, so it’s no surprise that the Deadpool stuff is handled really well. A little head’s up though, this book is DEEP into the current events of the main Deadpool series, so you may be a little confused about a thing or two if you’re not caught up on it.

That being said,  the big surprise is how well the Hawkeye side of things are managed is handled. There are a lot of clever nods to Fraction/Aja’s run, including 2 double spreads that parody the 2 most celebrated issues of Hawkeye.

Obviously any encounter between Hawkeye and Deadpool should be humorous, and the jokes do not disappoint. Duggan knows how to handle mixing humor and action well, and the laughs land more than miss. Visually,  Lolli and color artist Cristiane Peter are great, giving the book a clean, bright look that reminds me a lot of the late and great Mike Wieringo’s work.

 

Ultimately, this book isn’t going to win any awards or redefine the medium, but it’s a fun read for fans of the characters. If you’ve been enjoying Hawkeye and/or Deadpool, you’re sure to enjoy this double sized debut. If you want this to be your entry book to both characters though, you may want to look elsewhere.

 

123px-Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_3_25_TextlessUncanny X-men #25

Brian Michael Bendis/Chris Bachalo/ Several Inkers

Marvel $4.99

I’ll be honest, this book can be summed up as a double sized issue where the X-men stand around and react to a retcon. That may not be your cup of tea, especially when you factor in that it’s $5 and there’s still a chapter in this arc to go.

That being said, if you don’t mind that sort of thing, it’s a compelling as hell issue. Chris Bachalo returns to draw the hell out of this issue, despite him not knowing how Kitty’s Pryde modern costume works at times, or Cyclops mask reappearing at random.

Uncanny_X-Men_25_Preview_2Those minor issues aside, the book looks great. The army of inkers complement Bachalo’s pencils and colors well, giving the book a crisp, bold, cohesive look. Cohesive and GREAT mind you, as Bachalo delivers some really powerfully scene, both emotionally and action wise. Also the way he colors Iceman is great, as it looks like actual ice.

 

Brian Michael Bendis isn’t a slouch either mind you, but your opinion on the script may be different from mine. I’m a fan of the retcons he’s introducing, but it’s bringing Xavier into some scorched earth territory. If you’re an Charles Xavier fan, you may have a bone or two to pick with these reveals, but I’m strictly on Team Cyclops Was Right, and am digging Bendis doing some new stuff here.

Again, at $5, this issue of Uncanny X-men comes down to a matter of taste. If you’ve been a fan Uncanny’s direction since the Bendis relaunch, you’ll probably like issue 25. If you’re only thinking of jumping aboard because Original Sin is on the cover, you can skip it.

 

 

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I have bought some comi-SHUT UP HAWKEYE’S BACK!

This is where my usually hilarious intro paragraph goes, but I don’t got the time for that today. Hawk-talk time is now!

 

HAWKEYE2012013_COVHawkeye #13

Matt Fraction/ David Aja

Marvel Comics, $2.99, 20 pages

David $%$#ing Aja y’all.

As someone who’s given up drawing some time ago, I can only imagine the frustration that results in reading this issue/series if you want to draw comics for a living. David Aja, who’s almost reinvented himself for this book, returns after a brief hiatus, and shows us why this title won an Eisner and a Harvey for art in the same year. Using 9 panel pages (his idea, as I’ve asked  him as such  on the Twitter), Aja and Fraction finally reveal what Clint Barton’s been up to after the events in issue 9, filling in some the blanks and raising new questions. There’s some emotional stuff going down, as Clint’s life seems to be falling apart around him, due to the choices (both good and bad) that’s he’s made throughout the series.

Matt Fraction also does his share of heavy lifting in a relatively action free issue. His dialogue is pitch perfect, as you can tell his Hawkguy is obviously going through a rough patch, and Clint knows things aren’t going to get better anytime soon. Fraction’s Hawkeye is a very human one, despite rolling with the Avengers and 2 of his super powered exes showing up. Hawkguy’s little corner of the Marvel Universe is very dark right now, and it’s fascinating to see how Clint is going to get himself back on his feet. Marvel’s best book not-named Daredevil continues to amaze, and I cannot stress how great of a read it is.

 

a_x_13_cover_by_davidyardin-d6d1pajA+X #13

Gerry Duggan/David Yardin & Howard Chaykin

Marvel, $3.99, 20 pages

Once again I’m talking about A+X and once again Cyclops is featured in the title. Look I bought other issues without Cyclops in them. Like 5 of them. So I’m only semi-bias. #prspin

A+X #13 is a weird read, and I mean that in a good way. Instead of there being 2 done in one stories, we get a done in one by the legendary Howard Chaykin, and then the first chapter of a 6 part story by Duggan and Yardin. Duggan’s tale revolves around a really obscure early 2000s Alan Davis (or Claremont. I forget) X-storyline involving Skrulls, and is injected with the humor he’s known for from his current run on Deadpool. He doesn’t shy away from the fact that Cyclops and Cap still hate each other, so if you want to see a story where Cyclops attacks Captain America with a frying pan, this is the book. David Yardin handles the art duties, and it’s not the best drawn book out there, but it’s solid. It’s very Neal Adams’ influenced, and his Cyclops is actually really solid, so I imagine with only improves over time. The 2 enemies forced to work together story is nothing new, but it can be fun when used right. Hopefully this will be one of those stories, because the 1st chapter implies that it has the right tools to be.

The Emma Frost/ Black Widow Chaykin B-story is a little bit risque, and actually super funny at times. It’s weird seeing Chaykin’s art in color after reading Satellite Sam, but Edgar Delgado does some really interesting stuff with it, and I dig it, particularly when it comes to the coloring of Emma and Widow’s lips. Which sounds weird I know, but it really stands outs to me. It’s not an incredibly deep read, but it’s fun, which is all I ask for. Your mileage may vary with this book, but as someone who like the majority if the characters and creators involved, I liked it.

Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_3_13Uncanny X-men #13

Brian Michael Bendis & Chris Bachalo

Marvel, $3.99, 20 pages

There is a plethora of X-man on X-man violence in this book, and I am okay with this. It means Chris Bachalo can flex some creative muscles and go H.A.M. with the fight scenes, and he does. Big Swords, mutant powers and falling Deadpools make for a great throwdown, and the half-dozen inkers assigned to Bachalo work much better this time around. He’s probably one of the best “Widescreen” artists working in comics now, as his fights scenes are kinetic as hell, especially with Magik in particular.

That’s not to say that Bendis doesn’t contribute anything, because he does, as the last few pages unofficially tie-in both into Age of Ultron and this week’s Superior Spider-Man quite nicely. It leads to a nice little twist, which explains/spoils some stuff that’s been solicited as of late. I’m also really digging of the unexplained “History” related to the future X-men, which will hopefully be delve into more sometime down the line, because these little teases are KILLING me. And once again Bendis and Bachalo end the book with a final page that is beyond badass. Battle of the Atom continues to be everything I love about the X-men crammed into a super fun event.

And that wraps us this Marvel heavy week. Next time, I hope you like creator owned books, because I’m tired of yelling at y’all to support them. That and hell of  a pair debut on Wednesday.

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