Tagged: First Second

Farel Dalrymple Signing September 19th

Farel-DalrympleWe at Forbidden Planet are super excited to a special signing with the one and only FAREL DARLYMPLE for his new book The Wrenchies. Mr. Dalrymple will be in store on Spetember 19th at six p.m. to sign copies of his brand new (and long awaited) new graphic novel from First Second. We’re all a-tingle.

UPDATE: If you cannot make it to this event you can still pre-order signed copies through our webstore. You can request personalization at checkout if desired.

Post to Twitter

Nick Bertozzi Signing Shackleton at Forbidden Planet Wednesday 6/18/14

NY Times best-selling comics artist Nick Bertozzi Forbidden Planet NYC signing

 

Come by Forbidden Planet NYC Wednesday, June 18th, and get your copy of Shackleton signed by NY Times best-selling artist Nick Bertozzi!

About the book (which is GORGEOUS, by the way):

Ernest Shackleton was one of the last great Antarctic explorers, and he led one of the most ambitious Antarctic expeditions ever undertaken. This is his story, and the story of the dozens of men who threw in their lot with him – many of whom nearly died in the unimaginably harsh conditions of the journey. It’s an astonishing feat – and was unprecedented at the time – that all the men in the expedition survived.

Shackleton’s expedition marked the end of a period of romantic exploration of the Arctic and the Antarctic, and this is as much a book about the encroaching modern world as it is about travel. But Nick Bertozzi has documented this remarkable journey with such wit and fiendish attention to detail that it’s impossible not to get caught up in the drama of the voyage. Shackleton is a phenomenal accompaniment to Bertozzi’s earlier graphic novel about great explorers, Lewis & Clark.

And here’s a pic of the back cover I snagged off the First Second blog…

First-Second-Shackleton

Nick is just one of our many esteemed guests that night, along with Paul Pope, Dean Haspiel, Chris Miskiewicz, and Bob Fingerman. It’s gonna be a heckuva shindig. Hope to see you there!

Post to Twitter

Summa

I’ve taken up the ancient art form of origami as of late, and between creating lotus flowers, cranes, and tie-fighters, I have learned the power of creativity, dexterity, concentration, and the overwhelming urge to set all pieces of decorative paper on fire out of sheer frustration.I’d like to think there’s a metaphor for life somewhere in there, but I’m too consumed with rage to see it yet.Anyways, this books will calm me down…

 

Rust Vol 3: Death of Rocket Boy by Royden Lepp-Like a steam punk gateway, this beautiful and fantastical world has created a world that’s full of robots, family struggles, and jet packs. Life was forever changed for the Taylors, when Jet Jones and a decommissioned robot from the alternate universe World Wars crash land on their farm. Lepp has spent the previous two hardcover volumes building up family secrets, sacrifice, and robot action that will all come to a head in this penultimate book of the series. This book seriously is all ages, because I’ve recommended to readers of any age, and no one is disappointed with the action or the heart that sits at the core of these books.

 

Manifest Destiny Vol 1 by Chris Dingess and Matthew Roberts

History and giant monsters collide in this take on the REAL story of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark! Especially pertinent to us Washingtonians, or anyone who enjoyed a rousing CD-Rom game of the Oregon Trail, the journey to discover the Pacific Ocean is historical, but the truth is what will make this story legend. Wild monsters, infection, betrayal, and help from the French and Native Americans drive all first six issues of this collected edition. The American frontier is a dangerous place, I suggest using this as a guidebook for your journey.

 

This One Summer by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki– Summer is not officially here, but the memory is always present. Fires, camping, jumping in lakes, back sweat, booty shorts. If you’ve been missing any of the above, This One Summer, might help alleviate that. Possibly with less booty shorts than my summer, the one written and drawn by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki does capture the youthfulness of summer nostalgia, and then wrecks it. Rose and Windy are best beach buds, and have always looked forward to spending their long days doing what kids do best. But things have gotten rough between Rose’s parents, and Windy and Rose look for a distraction that ends up getting them involved in the even bigger problems of some older local kids. This might not have been the summer they dreamed up, but it’s one they’ll never forget. Cousin duo, the Tamaki’s, produce tween angst against artwork that has a beautiful flow.

thisonesummer_01

Rogue Trooper Classic #1 by Gerry Finley-Day and Dave Gibbons– Did James Stokoe’s covers on the new Rogue Trooper series make you wonder where all these badass blue warriors came from? Wonder no longer! IDW is bringing the original comics from 2000AD, created by Gerry Finley-Day and Dave Gibbons, back to life in fuuuuullllll cooolooooooorrrr. The war torn future is rife with chemical weapons and warfare, and the only ones able to fight the fight are the genetically modified infantrymen. These are the tales of one such Genetic Infantryman, Rogue. One part Full Metal Jacket, and one part Fallout, this classic series will feature appearances by Judge Dredd, who will feel right at home in the war ravaged Nu-Earth.

 

The Auteur #3 by Rick Spears and James Callahan– I know I mention this book every week, but I don’t STOP mentioning it because it’s LITERALLY THE BEST THING EVER. If I haven’t convinced you at this point to read a book that’s about a psychotropic drug rampage through Hollywood and your own mind, on the quest to create the most realistic horror film ever, then I haven’t been doing my job and I might as well jump off a cliff. (I also use the term job loosely because I have yet to receive as much praise and adulation and keys to cities and babies presented for healing kisses, as my words deserve)

Post to Twitter

Our 200 Best-Selling Graphic Novels of 2013

Even though it’s damn near the middle of February I thought the following list of Forbidden Planet NYC’s most popular, best-selling graphic novels of 2013 would be of some interest.

Perhaps you’re looking for a new read, and are curious as to what the cool kids in the heppest city in the solar system are picking up (even if some of these books have been perennial faves for years and years).  Perhaps you’ll be looking at this list for some other reason (stalkers). Either way, thanks to all our customers who made 2013, and every year, such a great time to be in the business of slinging quality books!

It’s a rather lengthy post so it continues after the jump…

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

Battling Boy and Yi Soon Shin Signing and Walking Dead Midnight Release Tuesday 10/8/13

This coming Tuesday:

battling_boy

  • Paul Pope’s Battling Boy FINALLY releases!!! We’ll be selling it for 25% OFF cover in-store day of release only.  It’s also available for mail order at that discount as of this posting (and will be so thru Tuesday) here and here.

yisoonshin

  • Frequent FP guest, writer Onrie Kompan, and artist Giovanni Timpano (his first trip to the U.S. if I’m not mistaken!) will be signing copies of their Yi Soon Shin books for a few hours, starting at 5pm,

walking_dead115

  • We will close at 10pm, but re-open two hours later for a special MIDNIGHT RELEASE of The Walking Dead #115!  Exclusive variant cover and maybe some chocalate milk if you’re good.

Post to Twitter

Morgan Pielli’s Pile of Minis: N.Y.D.I. #1

Having just returned from a great work-cation at this year’s SPX (selling my comics to a comics-thirsty public and then drinking wine like a wine-thirsty Bacchus), all I can think about right now is the self-publishing scene. And also not being on my feet all weekend. Not standing AND the self-publishing scene.

We are in the midst of an interesting and important moment in the history of comics. While the big publishers (DC, Marvel, and to a lesser extend Dark Horse) still wield tremendous power and influence, smaller players (Fantagraphics, Top Shelf, and Drawn & Quarterly) have carved out sizable niches in the marketplace. At the same time, newer and smaller small-press publishers like Secret Acres and Koyama Press are making names for themselves. Meanwhile book publishers have begun to dip their toes into the comics-publishing world as well. Some, like Roaring Brook Press and Lerner Publishing Group, have even created their own comics imprints (First Second and Graphic Universe respectively).

And yet, in addition to all of these different avenues for comics publication, their remains one more path; one that is wholly unique to comics: Do It Yourself self-publishing. In the world of prose and poetry, self publishing is looked upon as the last avenue of the un-publishable crackpot (having worked in publishing, I can tell you that every self-published book that we got WAS from an un-publishable crackpot). However, at this moment in comics, self publishing is very well regarded. Publishers and editors attend many of the larger small-press and indie comics conventions (in particular the MoCCA Comics Fest and SPX, though I see the boys from Secret Acres at nearly every show I attend) looking for new creators. At this year’s MoCCA Comics Fest, for example, an artist beside me was offered illustration work from an editor at First Second after someone she knew had seen his work and recommended that she have a look.

My point is, and I do plan on making it eventually (I like words…), that in comics self publishing is an important first step for many independent cartoonists. However, not everyone agrees that self-publishing is the way to go.

Enter Slow Wave author Jesse Reklaw and his minicomic N.Y.D.I. #1: A History in Publishing. N.Y.D.I., which stands for “No, You Do It” is a counterpoint to the DYI self-publishing movement. Reklaw recounts his years of experience self-publishing and how he came to the realization that it wasn’t for him. His comic is very frank and straightforward, and is in many ways a primer on what a self-publisher can expect to run into. As one myself, I found myself nodding with agreement as he led me step by step to the uncomfortable conclusion that self-publishing might be more trouble than it’s worth.

However, I do feel that he is omitting some of the realities of publishing comics; not the least of which is that if you are just starting out, no one else is likely to publish you. D.I.Y. self-publishing may not be a sustainable business model for most people, true, but if one approaches it less as a business and more as a way to improve artistically AND to get your name out into the comics world, then it is still a worthwhile endeavor. You just have to accept that you will be loosing money in the short term, and gamble that it will pay off in the long term with a publisher seeing your work and deciding to take a chance on you.

This is essentially what has happened to Reklaw. His experience self-publishing taught him lessons that he would later call upon when dealing with publishers, agents, marketers, and so on. As he says near this comics’ close: “I know that I’ll always be on the fringe of the publishing world, but it doesn’t mean I have to struggle alone. I just need to find the right publisher, designer, agent, and marketing people to work with. Easier than doing it all myself, I guess.” Which is true, certainly; but in order to get there, in order to find those kindred spirits, most of us will have to self-publish first, at least for a little while.

———
Morgan Pielli is the author of Indestructible Universe Quarterly.

Post to Twitter