Tagged: Fantastic Four

Creative Conversation With Matthew Rosenberg

Matthew Rosenberg has been a steadily rising star in comics for the last few years. After acclaimed run for his work on the gorgeous We Can Never Go Home, he broke down more doors over at Marvel with his Civil War II: Kingpin mini-series. The reception of which lead to the ongoing Kingpin series he’s currently got the fourth issue of coming out. He’s a creator who’s worked on almost every side of comics. He’s as versatile and knowledgeable a comics creator as there is and with the debuting Secret Warriors #1 coming out next week, Matthew Rosenberg will shock the world with his first team book amidst the turmoil of Secret Empire.

A former Forbidden Planet comics slinger like yours truly, we talk about the series he learned to read from, when he knew comics was going to be his way in the world, and what to expect from the mix of characters he’s getting to write in Secret Warriors!

MK: Welcome to another Creative Conversation. I am joined today by THE Matthew Rosenberg. Thanks for coming in and talking with me today, sir.

MR: Thanks for having me

MK: One of the questions that’s always fun to jump in with is, do you recall the first comic or run that stuck with you?

MR: Well the first comic I remember ever holding was an issue of Fantastic Four that my brother had. I remember carrying it around with me and just staring at the art, but having no idea what was actually going on. The first run I ever read was [Chris] Claremont’s X-Men. I basically learned to read with those books.

MK: Did you ever figure out what issue of Fantastic Four it was?

MR: No, actually. I’ve gone back and tried, but once I learned to read I was a big Fantastic Four fan, so all those blurred together in my adolescent brain.

MK: I’m in a similar boat with an issue of John Ostrander‘s Suicide Squad.

MR: Yeah. I am 99% sure it was John Byrne stuff. But who can say for sure.

MK: Well, no one can say it wasn’t John Byrne (laughs). You talked about Claremont’s X-Men run as what you learned to read on, is it safe to say that run is one that’s influenced you as a comics creator?

MR: Yeah. I think it’s safe to say that it heavily influenced me as a person. I feel like every issue I read of that book exposed me to new ideas and ways of thinking. A lot of my core beliefs go back to that run. And, obviously, my love of comics comes from there as well.

MK: That’s amazing to have that connection so early on. Did you have any other runs early on that helped you fall deeper in love with the medium?

MR: The Marvel Star Wars and GI Joe books were really important to me. I still have complete runs of both. The Mike Zeck Punisher stuff was major for me. Claremont and [Frank] Miller‘s Wolverine stuff felt insane to me in the best way. And the original TMNT was really mind blowing for me.

MK: Tell me you’ve been begging Marvel to work on a Star Wars book.

MR: Begging is a strong word. But yes. I am begging.

MK: I’d love to see you on a Boba Fett or Han Solo series.

MR: Those books have been amazing though, Jordan and Heather who edit the Marvel Star Wars line do a great job of curating it. They aren’t just letting any old riff-raff in the door, which hurts me as a creator, but makes me so happy as a fan. Yeah. There is so much I want to see. I always joke about how much I want to do a podracing comic with Daniel Warren Johnson on art. But I really want to do a podracing comic with Daniel Warren Johnson on art.

MK: I’d read it! Do you remember when you decided that you weren’t just going to be a fan anymore but that working in comics was what you wanted to do? And was writing always the path you saw for yourself?

MR: Yeah. I was working in music for a while and was just getting really burned out. I love music and hate the industry. At that point in my life, the only other thing I was really passionate about besides music was comics. They were a constant for me for almost my whole life.  So when I just couldn’t take doing music stuff anymore I started thinking more about making comics. I knew I couldn’t draw, but I wanted to be creative. My whole family are writers. My mom, my dad, my uncle, my brother. So, as much as it’s possible, writing is in my DNA. And I just sort of dove in from there, with no real idea what I was doing.

MK: You jumped in though! I mean one of the coolest things about your journey, knowing you as long as I do, is that you’ve seen a lot of different sides of comics that not every creator is familiar with. Can you talk a little bit about how you found your way in and the different aspects you’ve gotten to work on?

MR: Yeah. I’m sort of obsessive about stuff. I like to know how things work. So, I studied all aspects of comics I could. I was reading coloring guides and watching lettering tutorials, tracking down interviews with editors. But then I really wanted to know about things more hands on. I quit my day job and took a job at Forbidden Planet so I could really see how books were bought and sold. It’s so crucial for comic creators to understand their readers and their partners in retail. And it was eye opening. From there, I took a job at a few small publishers just doing whatever I could. Retail outreach. Publicity. Social media. Pre-production. Editing. I don’t ever like asking someone to do something for me, without really knowing what I am asking of them. So all of that was incredibly helpful. And it also helped me build relationships and open doors when I was ready to be making publishable work. Or semi-publishable work.

MK: I’d argue it’s all damn publishable! I mean you’ve been hitting home runs with characters like Kingpin and Rocket Raccoon, and now you’re getting your own team book in Secret Warriors, out on shelves May 10th! You’re really building a home at Marvel it feels like. How did this series come about? Did you go to Marvel with the idea for this team or was it a little more of meeting in the middle?

MR: Well thanks. I hope Marvel fans like what I’m doing. As for Secret Warriors, it’s a bit of a funny story. Wil Moss, who was my original editor on my Kingpin mini-series got put in charge of the Inhumans. I am a big Inhumans fan but a huge fan of Quake. I immediately emailed Wil to say that I had an idea for Quake that I wanted to pitch. I sent in the pitch and Wil was really enthusiastic, but he came back and said, “What if Quake was part of a team? We need a new team book.” And from there it all came together in bits and pieces. I feel really lucky because I love our cast. Ms. Marvel is bar none one of the best books at Marvel right now. Moon Girl & Devil Dinosaur has been a favorite of mine since it began. Inferno is a great part of Charles Soule‘s Inhumans run. And obviously Karnak is one of the great Marvel characters. So getting all of these wildly different together it just felt like we had a chance to do something really different and not what folks expect. I’m pretty proud of it.

MK: It’s a very cool mix of characters. What are you excited and hope readers will take away from the first issue on May 10th and from the rest of the first arc?

MR: I really hope people like what we do with the characters. I tried to be really faithful to who they are and what they are about, but we are putting some of them in very new and tough situations. I love them all, and really believe in them, but I want to see them tested. And I hope fans do, too. This book is a little darker and crazier than I think people are expecting. Things are really scary in the Marvel Universe right now, and our Secret Warriors are figuring out the best way to fight back. And that’s not always easy.

MK: Team books like this are always so compelling because of the relationships between teammates. Who do you think would butt heads the most, who might be the wild card, what makes these characters the best fit for this team? If they are.

MR: Well the first part is easy. Quake and Ms. Marvel butt heads the most. Ms. Marvel is a hero through and through. She wants to inspire. She wants to lead by example. And Quake was a spy and a weapon trained by Nick Fury. She knows that sometimes you have to do things that don’t sit right with you because they have to get done. I think Moon Girl is a real wild card. She’s not a team player, per se. She’s smarter than everyone else. And she is really just a kid. As for why they are each the best fit for the team? They aren’t. That’s sort of a real point in the book. They are six characters who are thrust together because of awful circumstances. They each have their own reasons for being there, their own agendas, and their own way of doing things. It’s a stretch to call them a team.

MK: That’s awesome.That’s just juicy to think about and see how they can coexist, if they can.

MR: Yeah. I think people will be surprised at where things end up. Or not.

MK: I love you bringing up Quake being Nick Fury’s apprentice. I remember it was you in fact who got me to read Jonathan Hickman‘s run on Secret Warriors where that relationship developed.

MR: Yeah. Hickman’s Secret Warriors is one of my all-time favorite comics. The way he has Quake and Fury working together, this troubled family dynamic, is so beautiful and heartbreaking.

MK: Totally agree and now she’s kind of in the Nick Fury role herself.

MR: It is something we are going to go into as the series goes on. Fury is gone and Quake is still very new to all of this. She’s tough and capable, but she never had the chance to grow into it. Fury dropped her in the deep end.

MK: To bring things back around a little as we head into the home stretch. you talked about how your whole family are writers. Why write comics? What is about comics versus say film or T.V. or the stage that sets it apart for you as a creator?

MR: I love all types of writing. People in my family have written novels, essays, movies, T.V. shows, plays, you name it. But for me, comics has always been my love. Everything about it from the worlds and characters, to the the tactile feel of a comic, to comic shops and culture. I find it all energizing and inspiring. That’s what attracted me.

MK: Thank you for that. If you could go back, what advice would you give the Matthew Rosenberg who was just starting out?

MR: Save more money. Sell more of your stuff you don’t need

MK: Fair. Totally fair. Which creators are on your personal Mount Rushmore of Comics?

MR: Oh man. Okay. Brian Michael Bendis. Frank Miller. Brian K. Vaughan, Chris Claremont. The Hernandez Bros., Osamu Tezuka, Charles Schulz. My Mount Rushmore is bigger than the other one. Wait! I want to change my answer

MK: Do you need a lifeline?

MR: I’d put Bill Watterson over Schulz. It’s blasphemy, I know

MK: I don’t know if it’s blasphemy. Calvin & Hobbes can be read at eight and twenty-eight and fifty-eight and mean something incredibly important and different at each age.

MR: True. I think Peanuts works on that level, too, in some ways. But Calvin & Hobbes always felt more like a narrative to me. Peanuts was much more of just moments in time. Oh, and Alan Moore. I’m bad at this

MK: You’re not bad at this, you just need a bigger mountain And last but not least, if you were working in  a shop and someone came up to you saying, “I’ve never read comics before, what should I read first?” What five books would you tell them to pick up?

MR: Y: The Last Man. V For Vendetta. American Splendor. Powers. Love & Rockets.

MK: It’s a good list…It’s a good list.  Well thank you, sir, for taking the time to talk with me today. I can’t wait to read the first issue of Secret Warriors!

MR: Thanks so much for having me.

Make sure you pick up your copy of Secret Warriors #1 coming out next Wednesday, May 10th!

 

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Picks of the Week June 26th 2013

…That I wrote for a New York newspaper that didn’t run it.  Think I missed a deadline. As we say on Earth, “c’est la vie.”

This week I’d spend my dough on:

joe casey sex #4 image comics

1. Sex #4, Image Comics. The po-po modern misadventures of ex-costumed vigilante Simon Cooke is top of the pile reading upon every new issue’s release. Writer Joe Casey at the top of his game.

2. Fantastic Four by John Byrne Artist Edition, IDW. They ain’t cheap, but these editions are some of the most gorgeous books on the market today. Scanned from the original, raw drawings, flubs and edits and all, these books reveal the true artistry behind some of the most iconic works in comics history. John Byrne’s FF run is generally considered only second to Lee and Kirby’s and the book reprints 6 full stories. Yowza.

3. Prophet Tp Volume 2, Image. I can’t tell if this is the most satisfyingly whacked-out, bizarrely constructed, science fiction title currently running. I think it is…? I think it is.

4. Godzilla Rulers of the Earth #1, IDW. Do you like Godzilla? Do you like comics? Then you’ll LOVE Godzilla comics. When done well, that is. Luckily IDW’s line of Godzilla books is excellent.

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What I bought at Heroescon, and what you should buy too.

::: Vacuums after a lengthy absence :::

Yo apparently this blog begins and end with me if the lack of updates indicate anything.

So Heroescon obviously has passed once again, and according to this article’s title, I was there. Yes that’s me dressed as Clint Barton with Hawkeye writer Matt Fraction. (No, you cannot touch me now.) My first Heroescon was dope, and SURPRISE, so was this year’s. I got to meet a ton of awesome creators, who’s stuff I’ll be highlighting in this article. Again see the title of this article, this is not a concept that is hard to understand people.

First off is Fraction’s first Fantastic Four collection, which collects the first 3 issues of both the NOW relaunched Fantastic Four and Future Foundation titles, with great art from Mark Bagley and Mike Allred. It’s worth noting that the books are reprinted in the order the series is meant to be read, which makes the narrative flow better in my opinion. ALSO ART BY MARK BAGLEY AND MIKE ALLRED, I CANNOT STRESS HOW AWESOME THIS IS! The 1st trade costs $17 and is well worth it. Yes this is my extremely bias opinion, given how much I love Fraction’s work, but yo, have I’ve ever steered you the reader wrong before?

What, no, you shut you, you are clearly wrong here.

Awesome artist Becky Cloonan was also in attendance an-ah screw it, LOOK ALIVE SUNSHINE! THE TRUE LIVES OF THE FABULOUS KILLJOYS HAS ARRIVED!

I’ll play this straight. Dark Horse has assembled a team that I love. I really dig writer’s Gerard Way’s “Umbrella Academy” stuffs, and yeah, I won’t front, I like My Chemical Romance. As for Becky, she drew the very awesome Demo with Brian Wood, another favorite of mine, so these 2 on a book that ties into my favorite MCR album is a must buy. The book’s debut issue is firing on all cylinders, and you definitely get your $4 worth it. Pick it up on sight.

Chris Sims,  of ComicsAlliance.com fame, was a guest in the massive Indie creator section of the con, and I’m a fan of his work I’m also a fan of Street Fighter, and the publisher Udon, which is a really roundabout way of saying that I bought Super Street Fighter Volume 1: The New Generation. This dropped last October apparently, and while I liked it, I’m a little hesitant to recommend it to everyone. As enjoyable as the side stories by Sims and friends are (I don’t want to know you if you can’t get down with a Balrog Vs. Dudley fight), the main story is strictly for fans only. Also the page count is a little weird due to the fact that there’s a lot of sketches/promo art packaged in. It retails for $35, which is kinda steep, but it’s also a over-sized hardcover, so the price is kinda justified if you’re into Street Fighter.

Kelly Sue Deconnick’s Captain Marvel is a book that I’ve been on board with since she wrote 2 issues of Avenging Spider-Man with Carol Danvers in them last year. So while I didn’t actually buy anything from her at Heroescon ( I did do a nice little write up of her Carol Corps panel over at Bleeding Cool http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/06/12/kelly-sue/), that will not stop me from pushing the 2 Captain Marvel trades currently available. Kelly Sue’s joined by relatively new artists like Dexter Soy and Filipe Andrade, both excellent story tellers in their own rights, as well as the great Emma Rios, who is currently working with KSD on Image’s upcoming “Pretty Deadly”. It’s good super hero stuffs with an easy jumping on point, and for $15 bucks a volume, you really can’t go wrong with this series.

That concludes my brief con report/creators I like plugathon. Next time I’ll be back plugging a dozen or so Play Arts.

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Review: Marvel Universe Doctor Doom

By Loran

I’m really starting to think I need to put more “rhythm” into my comic character collecting…

I got Deadpool before any of the other X-Men, Ms. Marvel before Captain Marvel; I own Iron Patriot and no Captain America (which I need to fix), I don’t have a good Hulk figure, I own Black Widow and Namor for… some reason and I have more Iron Men than I really need. And of course, I continued this by getting Doctor Doom before anyone in the Fantastic Four! At least there’s a boxset to help fix that now. Besides, he’s Doctor Doom. Who needs reason to own him?

I always thought Doctor Doom was kind of cool, probably because I like Destro from G.I. Joe so much. He’s kind of like the prototype for Destro, even if was a bit cooler, at least in my opinion. This mold was previously used in one of the Secret Wars comic packs with Wasp and Absorbing Man, sporting a much more “animated” color scheme. Whether you like the animated look or the “realistic” look is really a matter of opinion, but either way, this one gives you the option of just getting Doom by himself. Continue reading

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Costume, Partly

COSTUME CHANGE EDITION

Costumes shouldn’t be changed, ever. Trust me, I know. I’ve been wearing the same feety pajamas and diaper my parents brought me home from the hospital in for over thirty years now. Sure it’s smelly, falling apart, and a mental/physical health hazard to all who approach me. That’s not the point…it’s ICONIC!

DC just changed Wonder Woman’s outfit a few scant months ago and now they’re batting up for Superman’s costume reboot. And recape, and repants, and reshirt.  The Fantastic Four are now wearing white, Spidey has had about four different outfits in the last year (Regular, Back-in-black, Iron Spider and that Future black and red glowy thing) and even The Incredible Hulk family had to dye themselves red to stay on top of the fashion wars. Continue reading

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Warren Ellis Fantastic Four #1

Since FF#1 came out this week I figured why not tell you about Warren Ellis’ design your own Fantastic Four #1 cover challenge.  Well I guess there’s not much to it… Warren Ellis’ has an online thingie (bare with me I’m still new to this whole internet stuff) called Whitechapel where he interacts with fans in interesting ways, like this FF thing (no, not that FF Thing).

Here are a few personal favorites…

And how could I not love this beauty.

Thanks Warren for keeping things awesome, why don’t you all buy Nextwave to show him your appreciation.

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Indepentent Comic Publishers With Amazing Stuff

By Unkiedev

Oh good grief, here we go again. One thing I LIKE about independent comic book publishers is they have to have better ideas to stay afloat. If the small presses can’t tell stories the big three (or four) haven’t touched then they may as well pack it up and go home.

IDW has published some great titles over the years, but the cracks are starting to show. Consider:

IDW: INFESTATION, Various W/A, IDW

This is Marvel Zombies, a.k.a. DC’s Blackest Night done on a universal scale with the IDW properties. Haven’t you always wanted to see the Transformers, G.I. Joe, Star Trek and Ghostbusters properties attacked by zombies? NO, neither have I, and that’s why it has never happened.

Wait, the Ghostbusters? They get attacked by zombies all the time! How is that a special comic book event? That’s like saying “In today’s very special Peanuts Charlie Brown will have to do the unthinkable…he will have to attempt to kick a football!”

Apparently the premise is the “Robots Vs. Zombies” universe from IDW’s pretty dang alright Ashley Wood Robots Vs. Zombies comics is spilling out into their other licensed titles. I know they just killed off a pretty darn big and important character over in the pages of G.I. Joe… is this how they intend to bring that (Spoiler Free, I promise) character back? As a Zombie? Continue reading

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Graphic Novels And Comics In A Crisis

Things in my cave are GREAT, thanks! I’ve taken care of that horrible bear, found a few new non-poisonous mushrooms and even got a girlfriend …although she might just be a hallucination, a side-effect from one of the mushrooms. Girls are translucent, aren’t they?

It all makes me think back on the crazy days of yore, when each of my columns would start with me chased by possums or set aflame by spiteful wood elves. Ha. Good times.

COMICS

A must buy this week is Dark Horse’s collection of short stories, De: Tales by brothers Gabriel Ba’ and Fabio Moon. 112 pages of the two brightest new talents in comics going bananas with creativity. You loved them on Umbrella Academy and B.P.R.D., now see the good stuff they’ve been keeping for themselves. Speaking of these super-stars, they’re over at Marvel now with partner Matt Fraction on their CRAZY book Casanova, relaunching this week with a new #1!

Hmmm. My cave seems to be filling up with some water. I wonder if the toilet’s backed up. NO, that can’t be it, I don’t have one… Continue reading

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REVIEWS: ‘Superman Secret Origin’, ‘Planetary’, ‘Captain America Reborn’

Time to catch up on a couple of reviews, this is a mix of a couple of books that came out this week, and last week.

Fantastic Four #571Pick of the week: Fantastic Four # 571 by Jonathan Hickman and Dale Eaglesham.  I’ve never been a Fantastic Four man, but this issue captured my imagination. From what I understand, Fantastic Four has always been about family and the impossible.  I don’t think it can get more imaginative or impossible that Reed Richards creates this machine that sends him to an extra dimensional  plane where the Reed Richards of parallel universes meet and help change everything.  In this issue our Reed helps kill Galactus, with an army of other Reeds armed with Ultimate Nullifiers.  He helps create a planet full of feed that will feed starving planets, and performs surgery on the universe.  Its a wild, beautiful look into Reed Richards and what he does to save everyone, including his relationship with Sue. To be honest, I wasn’t a Fantastic Four guy before, but I’m locked in from now on. Rating: 9.0

Superman Secret Origin #1Superman Secret Origin #1: This is like Geoff Johns doing his take on Smallville. I feel like every once in a while DC allows a writer to present their take on the origin of Superman.  Mark Waid did his take with the awesome Leinil Yu with Birthright, John Byrne did his seminal retake and now a couple years later, Johns gets his. Which is cool for people to come in and see Johns do this. Its just not that interesting, and doesn’t need to exist.  Though it does give a great explanation for the glasses, and that is kind of adorable. What can I say? I’m a softie. I don’t want to spoiler but that was pretty creative with the glasses handling the heat vision. Rating: 7.0.

Captain America Reborn # 3: Brubaker is a slow burn kind of guy.  He starts out Captain America Reborn #3 very slow, but usually by the end, you see that its worth it. His entire run on Captain America and Daredevil has been just like that, and those are easily the best superhero comics out there today. So there is no reason to lose faith on that when coming into this title.  However three issues in and we’re still on the same thing.  Steve Rogers is Quantum Leaping through his life and Norman Osborn is after Bucky, Falcon, Reed Richards and the rest. That’s been beaten like a dead drum for three issues and the only thing that has moved the story forward is it being revealed to the media that Sharon Carter was the second shooter. We don’t get any repercussions of that and its just the third straight issue of, you guessed it, Steve Rogers is Quantum Leaping and the Thunderbolts are out to kill Bucky and Black Widow.  Sorry, you gotta advance the story a little bit more than that for me. Butch Guice is nice to look at though. Rating: 5.0

Planetary #27 preview. This was in the back pages of Ex Machina #45.  It has the main characters talking about building a Time Machine, and in typical Planetary fashion, building the time machine that is already laced in popular culture. The one from H.G. Wells book, and also my favorite sci fi novel ever.  Time travel, and especially interpretations on Wells’s book, has always tickled my stomach.  Both amaze me even to this day.  So the fact that one of the best books ever written and drawn tackling something in regards to Wells’ Time Machine is something I can’t wait for. Planetary #27, the final issue hits stands Oct. 2.

With Ex Machina ending and the final issue of Planetary coming out, I can’t help but say those are the last two books from Wildstorm that I still read.  So…I’ll be interested to see what Wildstorm does when these two books end.

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The Hollywood Lot Tour.

Christoph Waltz

In this week’s edition of the Hollywood Lot tour we have a replacement for Nicolas Cage in The Green Hornet, news on a possible Lobo star, Mark Millar, the awesome Bruce Campbell, and Julian Sands has been cast on Smallville.

  • The brilliant Nazi traitor from Inglourious Basterds Christoph Waltz has replaced Nicolas Cage to play Seth Rogen’s nemesis Chudnofsky in the Green Hornet. Well, that’s a step up certainly.  Previously, Rogen said that the character was meant to be scary, but “not over the top”. Sounds like Waltz is perfect for that angle.
  • The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) aka as Katherine Heigl’s dead boyfriend from Grey’s Anatomy wants to play Lobo, according to MTV’s Splash Page.  I think that’s possible, he seems like a guy who could do that. Sure.
  • Lobo creator Keith Giffen couldn’t be more thrilled with Guy Richie directing the Lobo movie. Shockingly, I don’t think I’ve ever read anything Giffen has been ecstatic over. But that’s cool that he digs this idea. Giffen said Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels was one of his favorite movies in ages.
  • Sam Raimi cameo artist Bruce Campbell will have a “major” part in Spider-Man 4, reports Access Hollywood.  From the report it sounds like the Burn Notice star will play a key role in the film. Access went off about him playing Myserio but I laughed loudly and shockingly at this statement to the point that the next door neighbor knocked to make sure I was okay.  Anyway, I love Campbell’s cameos, and more of him in the Spider-Man franchise the better.
  • Michael Ausiello sleuths that Julian Sands will play Jor-El on Smallville.  The Warlock star (wow, way to bust that one out) will make his first appearance as Clark Kent’s biological father in an episode titled “Kandor” and will establish his connection to General Zod (played by Callum Blue). I’m pumped for this season which premieres next Friday, Sept. 25, at 8pm.
  • Mark Millar opened his mouth again about his epic Superman movie trilogy.  He says he thinks he’s too expensive for DC/Warners now with his success in regards to Wanted and Kick-Ass. That’s fine, Mark, they weren’t interested anyway, you just sound really bitter. Regardless, they have no plans for Superman, says newly minted DC Entertainment President Diane Nelson.
  • Chris Evans is likely to not be in the Fantastic Four reboot which is a shame because he was the best part of that series.
  • Finally, the movie adaptation of Greg Rucka and Steve Lieber’s Eisner award winning Whiteout was a flop this weekend.  The Kate Beckinsale staring film only raked in $5.1 million this weekend.  Haven’t  seen it yet, but considering my love for all things Rucka related, I’ll endeavor to make it.

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Let’s take a spin around the Hollywood Lot.

deadman

Some movie news, because I like that stuff, so sorry if I drown you all in it, but there have been some interesting things of note.

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