Tagged: capcom

Countdown to NYCC part 2

by Chris Troy

Hey FPNYC faithful, in a few short hours, yours truly will be at the Javitis Center, fan-gasming over the nerdfest that is the 2011 New York Comic Con. Despite being a show veteran, this is my favorite convention of the year, and I’m really excited to see what the likes of Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, Image, Bioware, & Capcom have to offer to the attendees this year. And depending on security, I may decide to stalk Captain America himself Chris Evans come Saturday. For you know, article research related reasons. REALLY!

Last article we focused on a lot of the comic goodness that will be at NYCC. I’m not saying I won’t be talking about the onslaught of Marvel Universe figures we received over these last 2 weeks later on in the article, but I decided to  focus on something a little more animated first. Cartoon Network & Adult Swim will have a large presence at NYCC once again this year, hosting a ton of panels with sneak peeks of a lot of their new and returning program. Regular offenders Jackson Publick and Doc Hammer will be in attendance, talking about their hit show “The Venture Bros“. And in case you want something other than DVDs signed by the duo, FPNYC currently has in stock the 8′ Venture Bros classic Mego-style figures (or dolls, if you’re up for the particular debate). The 1st 2 waves in the series consist of the likes of Hank  and Dean Venture,  their old man Dr. Venture,  Brock Samson, the (mighty) Monarch, and “humorless #$@!” Phantom Limb. These retro style-figures go for about $15-$20 a pop, and probably wont be around long, given the show’s rabid fanbase.

We also received a ton of product from Cartoon Network’s newest revival hit, the Thundercats! Bandai-Namco will also be at  NYCC, but I’m none too certain if they’ll be much of a push for the show at the convention. That doesn’t mean a trip to FPNYC to check in on these figures isn’t warranted. Bandai has released 2 different toy lines based on the new show (as well as some toys based on the 80s versions as well!). There’s a line of 6″ figures consisting of the likes of Lion-O, Panthro, & Mumm-Ra (The Ever-Living!), as well as 2 different 4″ figure lines, one standard line that covers most of the show’s cast, and a deluxe one that comes with big-honking accessories. Prices range anywhere from $10-$20 depending on the figures, so keep an eye out for them on our shelves the new time you come by. Continue reading

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D-arts Mega Man X Review

By Loran

You know how I said I wasn’t a big comic book fan as a kid? Weeeell, the same could sort of be said towards a lot of video games. I have a Playstation, yes, but I didn’t have nearly as many games as some of my friends did. I never had a Nintendo system aside from the Game Boy and its descendants. But there was one character I always took a bit of an interest in… and it wasn’t through the games. It was a certain cartoon series that turned me onto him.

Yeah. The 90’s Mega Man cartoon. It was hokey as all hell, but I liked it. I actually got an original copy of Mega Man X and played through most of it a few months ago.

You can bet I was excited when this guy got announced. Continue reading

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NECA Player’s Select Line

by Christopher Troy

Up to now, most of the video game related figures we’ve looked at have been created by Square Enix, as most of them have been based on Japanese properties. However, Square’s expansion to non-Final Fantasy/ Kingdom Hearts properties is still fairly new, and they wouldn’t be the first company to handle both eastern and western video game properties this decade (Technically Toy Biz is, but those toys are super dated). Ever since 2004, NECA has been working with a number of publishers to create figures based on best selling games and franchises. Today’s article will highlight some of the products they’ve churned out these last couple of years, both the good and the bad.

In the beginning…..

The first line of video game related toys that introduced me to NECA was the Resident Evil 4 line. This wasn’t the first time a American company had attempted to create toys based on the best selling Survivor-Horror Games (again Toy Biz covered Resident Evil 1-3 with figures in the  late 90s),  and NECA launched with a line that was well sculpted (for 2004) and came with a decent amount of accessories per figure. Pictured is RE4 lead Leon S Kennedy, who aside from a handgun, came with a knife, rocket launcher and a few grenades. The major flaw with these figures were that articulation on them were severely limited, and were sculpted in odd positions, attempting to be like McFarlane Toys. NECA released 2 lines for RE4, and then figures based on the Resident Evil 1 remakes, but would not touch the line again until 2009. We’ll get back to that later.

NECA’s sculpts got better with time, as they moved on to work on figures based on popular Eidos properties like Tomb Raider and Hitman, but the first line of video game toys that really caught my attention were based on Konami’s Castlevania series. The first (and sadly only) line in the set focused on the original Castlevania, as well as Symphony on the Night, arguably the most popular entry in the series to date. NECA finally managed to combined good sculpts with better articulation, as seen with Alucard and the Succubus. These improved sculpts didn’t mean that NECA would cut back on accessories though, as both figures came with weapons from the game, and in the Succubus’ case, a tiny demonic sidekick. These figures have proven to be very popular, and the line was re-released several times, to the point the FPNYC still has them in stock. Continue reading

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Review Arts: Devil May Cry 4 Playarts Dante

by Christopher Troy

I have a love/hate relationship with Capcom. I love me some Resident Evil and Street Fighter, the original Devil May Cry was the reason I bought a PS2, and like anyone who reads comics and plays fighting games, I’m incredibly excited for Marvel vs. Capcom 3. But keep in mind the same company also released Devil May Cry 2, Dark Void, that terrible new Bionic Commando, and those god-awful live action Resident Evil films. Ironically, while waiting to go see the newest one, I stumbled into FPNYC to discover we actually had the new Devil May Cry 4 Playarts Kai in stock. This was the 2nd or 3rd time we had them in stock since July, as the line shipped with the Bayonetta line, but they have the habit of selling out within days. That being said, I snagged Dante, who until now, had 1 oddly sculpt Revoltech and a bunch of subpar figures, because I like the character something fierce.

Series Origin and Legacy: The original Devil May Cry debuted within a year of the Playstation 2’s launch, forever changing the way action games were to be played. Spawning from the same creative team that brought Resident Evil to the PS1, DMC was actually based on an early built of Resident Evil 4, but it eventually became it’s own thing. The game was a hit in Japan and the States, spawning 2 more sequels on the PS2 of varying quality, as well as a animated series through Madhouse that was brought over by ADV and later FUNimation, and as well as some manga and novels brought over to the States via Tokyopop  a few years back. There’s also been the standard statues, figurines, t-shirts and messengers bags.  Devil May Cry 4 dropped in 2007 for both the PS3 and the Xbox 360 and was met with mixed reviews. The Playarts we’re looking are based on the 4th DMC game. Continue reading

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Incredible Hulk Games

Incredible Hulk GamesOne of the best video games of 2009 was Eidos Interactive’s Batman: Arkham Asylum. The game’s success can be attributed to its skillful blending of stealth and fighting play style, coupled with tight level and character designs. Helping out the title’s awesome factor was the fact that it did star Batman.

Gotham’s resident bad-ass is always good for a video game: He’s dark, has fun weapons to throw as well as colorful villains to fight across the sprawling maze of a dirty city. If video games never existed they’d have to be invented just so Batman could run amok in them. A case could be made for games trumping movies as a medium conducive to conveying Batman’s gestalt… though comics would still beat them both and steal their lunch-money hands down!

The same could be said for Spider-Man, who has had great success in video games starting with his classic 1982 Atari 2600 cartridge and continuing on to Activision’s current crop of PlayStation titles. Neversoft’s 2000 Spider-Man game was a notable stand-out as it was one of the earliest Spidey titles offering a sandbox city to swing around in, as well as alternative costumes galore! Continue reading

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