Tagged: Batman Inc

Batman?! Batman you say?!

by Chris Troy

Well I managed to make it like, 2 weeks without talking about the big, bad bat. That’s impressive, as I think that’s the longest I’ve gone without discussing Batman related-merchandise on this blog since I’ve talked about things that weren’t Gundam related. But thinking it over, it makes sense, as the Bat is DC’s main cash cow, with children, fangirls and man-children all fans of the Batman. And with a ton of amateur “Dark Knight Rises” photos hitting the internet to help build hype for 2012 biggest non-Marvel movie,  it makes a ton of sense for DC & Mattel to be pumping out a ton of merchandise.

Up first is the recently released DC Direct “Batman Inc” line of figures, based on the Grant Morrison penned series that’s running late and may actually mess up the DC reboot/relaunch if  the 3 remaining issues don’t ship by 8/31. The first wave consist of Batman in his Morrison/David Finch redesign (sans shorts!) costume, Damian Wayne Robin, The Knight (England’s Batman) & the native American Batman Man-of-Bats.  Note: Bruce was out of costume for over a year, and despite 2 toylines that revolved around that fact, not once did we get a Dick Grayson Batman. DC, I am disappoint. That being said, this line is pretty cool. Bruce actually has ball-jointed shoulder joints, making arm movement for the figure easier. Damian is the smallest, making him in-scale with the other figures and comes with a staff and a sword, both of which a taller than he is. Man of Bats comes with a tomahawk (not sure if racist) and the Knight, who 1st debuted in Morrison’s JLA run (available in 4 glorious hardcovers) over a decade comes with nothing, but the stand. I’d complain more, but it’s the Knight, who I never expected would get his own figure, let alone an awesome mini-series written by Paul Cornell of Doctor Who fame, so I’ll take my victories when I can get em. Each of the 4 figures retail for about $20 a pop, and with fan-favorite characters like Damian and The Knight involved, you’ll want to pick them up ASAP. Continue reading

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Neon Genesis Family Guy

By Chris Troy

FLASH FACT: I am thrilled with any time I can get a chance to talk about toys that aren’t Batman-related on this blog (thus forever putting me at odds with Comics Alliance’s Chris Sims). DC Direct has shown me some pity and not released any new figures as of the time this article was written (although the Batman Inc. wave should be hitting shelves any day now), so this week gives me the chance to focus on some non-Super Hero stuff, which again, I am thrilled about. I think I’ll start things off with taking a look at one of the newer Figmas (by Max Factory) that FPNYC  has stocked. It’s Asuka Langley (Well, technically Shikinami Asuka Langley thanks to the slight retcon, also I don’t think this is her first Figma. Or was that Revoltech? There is a lot of Eva toys out there…) in her Test Plug Suit from Neon Genesis Evangelion 2.2 , which has been one of the best selling US anime releases on DVD/Blu-Ray this year, brought over by the fine people at FUNimation. I’ve spoken of both Eva 2.2 and it’s toys in the past (At least 2 different Mari entries come immediately to mind), so this mini-review shouldn’t come as much of a suprise to returning readers. Continue reading

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A is for Asphyxiation

There comes a time in any comic book collector’s life where they must make a choice: do I buy supplies to protect my collection or do I just continue throwing them in a dingy old pizza box beneath my dead rat collection?

Both plans have their merits, though only one of them is correct.


The obvious advantage to the dead rat/pizza box scenario is security. No one is going to mess with your Batman Inc. #1 when it’s covered in old cheese and maggots. Advantage number two: The easier it is to get access to your comics, the easier it is to share them with friends.

I always keep a couple of DC and Marvel Omnibus and Showcase telephone books around on my coffee table because they make for great reads while entertaining. Nothin’ is as much fun as old school, Silver age weirdness. By having your comics ready to be lent out in a jiff you can maximize the exposure of your favorite artists and writers amongst your pals, increasing your visibility as a taste-maker and person-in-the-know.

Further, the more you treat your comics like they are simple, disposable fun the more assessable and demystified they become to others. Maybe that’s your thing.

The disadvantage of the rat/pizza thing is that it’s flipping disgusting and, not that comics should be about the speculation, but you permanently cripple the resale value. Continue reading

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