Tagged: Andy Kubert

Dark Days: The Casting Gets Jokerized!

For all you Joker fans out there, congratulations. With “The War of Jokes and Riddles” going on over in the primary Batman series scripted by Tom King, the Clown Prince of crime is getting a bigger spotlight. This time he’s not just playing with old Batsy. No, now the Joker is playing a part in a mystery of the entire DC Multiverse in Dark Days: The Casting #1.

Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo brought the Joker to new heights with stories including “Death of the Family” and “Endgame.” Snyder and his protege, James Tynion IV made a major reveal of the Joker being (SPOILERS!) deep in the bowels of the batcave at the end of Dark Days: The Forge #1. Now, getting to play with one of his favorite toys, what carnage will Snyder wreak on the wider DC landscape. There’s nothing the Man Who Laughs like to do more than destroy the Dark Knight. All of the teasers are promising Batman’s carefully laid plans that we got hints of last month will be burned to dust by the next surprise attack of the Joker.

DC’s self-proclaimed “master class” of artists, Jim Lee, Andy Kubert, and John Romita Jr. return for this next installment leading up to Dark Knights: Metal. By the by, not knocking these three men as masters but they aren’t students or old timers past their prime (feel free to argue in the comments section). Major revelations are coming and Batman’s allies are low on trust for him. With three of the most acclaimed and beloved artists teaming with two of the best writers at DC, the mysteries will only deepen.

How will Hawkman’s warning have consequences for the heroes today? Will Duke and Green Lantern be able to look past Batman’s betrayal and guard the newest threat to the entire multiverse? And, man, this we still have the main even to come! Summer’s heating up with a smile.

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The Dark Universe Is Built In Dark Days: The Forge #1

The Path To DC’s Biggest Event of 2017 Begins in Dark Days: The Forge #1.

The Dark Multiverse begins here! No, not the Dark Universe that few people in North America went to see this past weekend in The Mummy (much love to Tom Cruise and Sophia Boutella), we’re talking about the one that’s being charted by Scott Snyder. Along with his trusty protege, James Tynion IV, Dark Days: The Forge #1 is our first step towards exploring new corners of the multiverse that no one’s ever touched on before. Personally, I’m a big fan of the multiverse. I’ve always loved the Esleworld stories and when it was established that they could technically all coexist simultaneously, I was onboard. The multiverse has been one of the greatest assets to DC Comics in its existence and now we get to see Snyder and Tynion flex their muscles by blowing our minds with new takes on the pantheon of DC heroes.

We’ve been told it’ll begin with Aquaman, The Flash, and other heroes suspecting that Batman’s hiding a dark secret that could put the entire multiverse at risk. Now, Bats does keep secrets from his fellow heroes. This is well-trodden territory. But the scope is intriguing. Does this have something to dow with the story of the three Jokers we’ve been teased since the Darkseid War? Which legendary DC hero’s origin is going to get blown up as we know it? The possibilities might just be limitless!

Plus, can we look at the all-star list of artist? Jim Lee, Andy Kubert, and John Romita Jr. are all onboard this issue. That’s a heck of a line-up. When you think of blockbuster universe altering and expanding stories, those three creators might come to mind as talents that can handle the pressure to deliver something epic.

There’s no doubt this is going to be a massive story but it also has been promising to be a lot of fun. Time to get the multiversal party started this week.

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The End Is Here For DARK KNIGHT III: THE MASTER RACE #9

Is the world beyond saving in DARK KNIGHT III: THE MASTER RACE #9?

It’s the end of the world as we know it and Batman feels fine…Well, he’s feeling like his old self again since having his youth and health restored by a Lazarus pit bath. Superman’s really just the most helpful best friend/former enemy a rodent-inspired vigilante can have. The Amazons have barely survived a brutal battle with the Kandorians, who have now turned themselves into living weapons and are ready to destroy a world they may no longer be able to subdue. Carrie Kelly is officially the next Batgirl. The Atom claims he has discovered a way to put the Kandorian genie back into the bottle he opened. Lara El is at a crossroads of whether she’ll finally come aid her parents or join in the genocide with the Kryptonians, who she feels closest to after an entire life of feeling separated from the rest of the world. Can Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, and what allies remain upright save the world one more time or will the fanatical Kandorian army led by Quar prove the world is beyond salvation?

It’s time for the final battle. The old guard must stand again and bring about a remnant of an age of heroes though they’re morals and means have somewhat darkened in Frank Miller‘s dystopian vision of a future.

Pick up the final chapter of this third part of the Dark Knight Saga as Frank Miller, Brian Azzarello, Andy Kubert, and Klaus Janson close it out with what’s sure to be some king of big bang. We thought we’d only get eight issues of this event series and here we are treated to an extra helping, lets see how fulfilling it is.

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Amazons Attacked In The Dark Knight III: The Master Race #8

“FINALLY, DK III #8 has come back, to Forbidden Planet!”

Or at least that’s what I imagine The Rock would say if he came into the shop this New Comic Book Day (Mr. Johnson, if you somehow are reading this and will be in downtown NYC on March 29th, please do stop by we’d love to smark out in front of you).

The main thrust of it is that Frank Miller and Brian Azzarello‘s latest installment in the seemingly never-ending Dark Knight saga is here. At last. Thank Rao. After the crazy cliffhanger of the last issue there’s a lot we readers need answers to. One thing’s for certain, Baal’s Kryptonian army is planning to bring the pain to the Amazons. Themsyscira is squarely in the Kryptonians’ sights and all Hades is busting to break loose at the smackdown of mythic proportions coming our way.

SPOILERS AHEAD, DO NOT READ IF YOU HAVEN’T PICKED UP THE DARK KNIGHT III: THE MASTER RACE #7

Okay, now that we in-the-know folks have a little bit of privacy let’s discuss that major cliffhanger for a second. Bruce Wayne’s back to the prime of his youth! Remember how Frank Miller originally crafted a story about an aging Batman with a death wish? Yeah, this series isn’t about that anymore. Plus, with Mr. Miller’s statements about wanting to write further Dark Knight series and spin-offs, this appears (and I cannot stress that word enough) to be the new status quo moving forward. But Bruce just took a dunk in a Lazarus Pit. We all know that means a small piece of a person’s left behind as a price to pay for renewed youth. What part of Bruce is gone? How bat-crazy is he right now? What are he and Superman going to do in the face of the battle on Themyscira?

We all thought this was the end but clearly with a crazy massive climax coming, it’s no wonder we’re going to get an extra issue to this mini-series that’s taking it to the max. All together now: Duh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh, Batman!

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Review: Batman Volume 6: Graveyard Shift

51hNXab4FEL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Batman Volume 6: Graveyard Shift

Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo/ Marguerite Bennett/Andy Kubert/James Tynion IV/Alex Maleev/Andy Clarke/Dustin Nguyen/ Wes Craig/Matteo Scalera/Gerry Duggan

DC Comics, $24.99

With the first 5 volumes of the Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo run on Batman, we the reader got a series of cohesive and quite excellent stories by the same team of creators. Those who have been reading the book monthly have had a different experience, as there has been several issues that have interrupted this run with some guest creative teams. Volume 6 is a collection of those issues, which range back to as far back as 2012 and as recent as 2014. Needless to say, this book is a bit disjointed,  with some of the material dated already.

One of the biggest things to occur during the Snyder/Capullo era was the death of Damian Wayne, which occurred over in the Grant Morrison/Chris Burnham Batman Inc. title. With it not happening in Batman proper, trade waiters now finally get to see that event addressed by Snyder and several other creators in a few different stories. The downside of that is that Damian was already revived earlier this year (with an ongoing set to debut soon), so said stories kind of lose their impact. It’s even worse if you’ve only been reading this incarnation in trade, as there’s zero explanation as to how Damian passed. There are also 2 Year Zero-era tales included, which is odd for several reasons. The biggest one being that Year Zero was already collected in Volumes 4 & 5, and would have made more sense being included there than in this volume. Finally, the last story collected is tied into the recently concluded Batman: Eternal, which I feel would have been suited for one of those trades more so than this one.

BM_19_300-005_HD.480x480-75So while this book feels scatterbrained and uneven, it also looks fairly sharp. Greg Capullo is joined by a ton of talented artists. Andy Kubert, Dustin Nguyen, Alex Maleev, Andy Clarke and Matteo Scalera are some of the more notable contributors and while their styles are all wildly different, they all bring their A game. It’s a little jarring to see different artists tackle the Gotham envisioned by Greg Capullo at first, but these veteran artists contributions are great none the less. It helps that Scott Snyder oversees if not straight up writes a lot of the guest stories, so the tone feels consistent throughout the collection.

Joining Snyder on writing duties are two of his former students, James Tynion IV and Marguerite Bennett. The Snyder penned material is obviously the strongest, and Tylion and Bennet aren’t exactly slouches either. Similar to Snyder, both writers mix horror and action scenes well, although none of their dialogue ever hits as hard as Synder’s does. It’s almost a bit of a unfair comparison, as neither of those two have Greg Capullo to work with. The story written by Gerry Duggan is antiquate: not the best Batman story in this volume, but nothing wrong with it, and it looks great. Matteo Scalera was a perfect fit to draw a Batman story, and his stylistic take on the character is fantastic.

Batman Volume 6: The Graveyard Shift is a weird anthology of sorts. The Snyder/Capullo issues are great, and anyone who’s dug their work in the past won’t be disappointed. The other issues require some knowledge of the going-ons in other DC comics, but are enjoyable none the less. It’s not the best collection of Bat-Material in this run, but it’s a fun little collection of stories that will hold you over until Endgame is reprinted. A shame it’s not as accessible as the past collections have, but that’s not really on the creators as it is on whoever decide to collect the book like this.

 

 

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This week in new arrivals: Pirate-Batman, Supergods and the World’s Tiniest Fighters!

By Chris Troy

It’s a good week to be a nerd, FPNYC faithful! Captain America is kicking ass in theaters (stay after the credits btw, the teaser for the next big Marvel movie is amazing!), there’s a plethora of awesome news coming from San Diego Comic Con (Play Arts Batman?!?!?!? Square-Enix, you are too kind!) and Grant Morrison‘s “Supergods” is on shelves! Grant is arguable my favorite writer working in comics today, as his runs on New X-men, All-Star Superman, JLA and various Batman titles are without a doubt my favorite take on those characters. “Supergods” is a non-fiction novel which tells the history of comics, as well the story of Grant’s own life. A $30 hardcover novel, I’m about 3/4th through it and I can honestly say it’s a solid auto-biography/history lesson. Just expect a lot of Morrison’s crazy-babble when it comes to his experiences with drug-use during his time writing “The Invisibles” and a bit of Alan Moore bashing (which as much as I like the man’s work, is deserved at times). Some of the copies we have are signed as well, so it’s worth adding to your bookshelves if you want a fascinating look into the life of one of comics’ most talent writers, as well as a pretty solid history of the medium. Continue reading

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