Category: Top Shelf Comics

Nemo Heart of Ice Now in Stock

NEW from Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, two masters of the comics medium who, when releasing new work, the very ground should tremble and humanity cower in awe…. It’s the Nemo Heart of Ice original harcover graphic novel!!!

Alan Moore Kevin O'Neill

In the grim cold of February surfaces a thrilling new League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book – Nemo: Heart of Ice, a full-color 48-page adventure in the classic pulp tradition by the inestimable Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill.

It’s 1925, fifteen long years since Janni Dakkar first tried to escape the legacy of her dying science-pirate father, only to accept her destiny as the new Nemo, captain of the legendary Nautilus.

Now, tired of her unending spree of plunder and destruction, Janni launches a grand expedition to surpass her father’s greatest failure: the exploration of Antarctica. Hot on her frozen trail are a trio of genius inventors, hired by the megalomaniacal Charles Foster Kane to retrieve the plundered valuables of an African queen. It’s a deadly race to the bottom of the world – an uncharted land of wonder and horror where time is broken and the mountains bring madness.

Maybe “cower” is a bit too strong.  Hopefully you get the gyst, though.

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TRY SOMETHING NEW Chapter 12: An Armored Space Station With Enough Power.

The reviews are in! I was told this week that my column is mostly me “talking about yourself  for 2 pages and then recommending a book.” While technically that is more of a synopsis than a review, the point still stands. I talk a lot about myself in this thing. There is a good reason for that though. I am a weirdo recluse who reads too many comics and can’t relate well to other people. I tend to wall off my emotions for fear of burdening others with my problems and I put on a big, farcical parody show of my own existence so that people will like me. I do this by talking about myself too much. My only real friend in life is Forbidden Planet’s Tech Wizard/Fresh Eater, Tyler, who I think hates me. I don’t value my own ideas and opinions so I try and build myself up into this larger than life character that is always trying to keep people entertained. This is why I have and how I rationalize having a column when I feel this deep rooted personal inadequacy. It’s a shell game, a distraction, using humor and long-winded anecdotes to keep people at arms length so they can’t realize that I don’t really have anything of substance to offer them. Thanks for bringing that up. Your criticism (synopsis) has been taken to heart. So this week we are going to TRY SOMETHING NEW. I am just going to write about some comics and remove myself from the dialogue entirely. I am bringing the integrity back to this column, this store, and comics journalism everywhere. I apologize for all the minutes of your life I have wasted with my sad, self aggrandizing charade and I hope you, my loyal-ish readers, will appreciate the new format.

First review: FIVE WEAPONS is a new 5 issue monthly comic book mini-series. FIVE WEAPONS is published by Image Comics Inc. FIVE WEAPONS is written by Jimmie Robinson. FIVE WEAPONS is pencilled by Jimmie Robinson. FIVE WEAPONS is colored by Paul Little. FIVE WEAPONS is lettered by Jimmie Robinson. FIVE WEAPONS is 32 pages, including ad materials. FIVE WEAPONS is full color, printed on 70 lb. low gloss stock with self cover. FIVE WEAPONS is rated T for Teen. FIVE WEAPONS is the story of a boy who is not properly equipped yet still attends a school for deadly assassins. FIVE WEAPONS is a spinoff of Jimmie Robinson’s semi-popular BOMB QUEEN series. In recent years Image Comics Inc., the publisher of FIVE WEAPONS, has had a higher than average success, rated against other independent comic publishers over the same period, of launching new intellectual property. Often times first printings of Image Comics Inc. #1 issues sell out at the distribution level and yield an average appreciation of 221% on the secondary market within a fiscal year. It is speculated that Image Comics Inc.’s sellout issues and surrounding media attention are, in part, based on the companies refusal to print overstock beyond the initial orders placed by Diamond Comics Distribution LLC at time of F.O.C. This leads to what some analysts deem to be an artificial scarcity that could be creating a “false” appreciation in value. The sustainability of that appreciation outside of the “speculation bubble” is based, in large part, on the intellectual properties options being picked up for development in a secondary medium. At the time of this writing FIVE WEAPONS has not been announced to have been optioned. Image Comics Inc. has recently stated that they are changing their policies in regards to overstock printing. How this will affect the secondary market for upcoming titles remains to be seen. Consumers looking to purchase a new story about superpowered assassins or looking to invest in a new property with sizable fiscal growth potential would do well to purchase FIVE WEAPONS #1 on or near Wednesday, February 27th.

Blaaaaaah. Barf. Snooze. The new format sucks. Integrity be damned. Actually just talking about books is boring. Sorry. We are going back to the old format of me talking about me talking about books. Sorry if it bums you out anonymous reader, but I don’t get paid to do this so I am beholden to no one but myself. Say it with me crust punks on St. Marks Place who only come to Forbidden Planet to try to charge their cell phones- “No gods! No Masters!” I might up the ante here and talk about me talking about me talking about books. I may already be doing that. We are getting meta here. I might pull a Grant Morrison and start making appearances in the comics in my columns. I might start lying about what the comics are about. I might start reviewing books that only exist in my head. Next week’s column is going to be called TRY SOMETHING THAT DOES NOT NOW NOR EVER WILL EXIST. It will serve no purpose other than to amuse me and abuse you, disloyal reader. And when I see you stop reading it in disgust in the store I will match your disgust with my own and I will follow you home and read it out loud to you until you beg me to stop, until you vomit. Who is the narcissistic self obsessed weirdo now, huh? Ok. Now let’s get back to sort of talking about comics.

Alan Moore has two new books out this week. The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen spinoff NEMO and the re-release of photo/literary biography of famed occultist/comic writer Steve Moore, UNEARTHING. Buy both of them or don’t tell people you like comics.

I am going to cram a three-fer of Marvel books into one paragraph. Why? 2 reasons. 1. When I post my reviews of Marvel books Marvel staff don’t ever tweet or post about it. They are too busy “complaining” about Bleeding Cool talking about their books to bother to support small blogs of large comic book stores (not bitter). 2. But these books are something new from Marvel though so I should be covering them and you should be giving them a chance. The compromise? Less column space. First up- GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #0.1 (Oh WTF Marvel?!? What the Holy #&<@ is that? Use whole numbers!). Guardians is a funny one. A few years ago Marvel couldn’t pay you to give a $#!% about their “cosmic” books even though they were, for the most part, very good. Then they decided to make a Guardians Of The Galaxy movie so they pumped a lot of money into telling you you like Guardians Of The Galaxy and you believed them. Lucky of all of us the new book is really good. Successful cultural brainwashing! 2. ULTIMATE X-MEN #23 (A whole number! Yay!) Ultimate X-Men has been a Bermuda triangle for brilliant comic writers for years. Bendis, Millar, Vaughan, Kirkman, Carey, etc have all done some of their worst work there. For some reason Brian Wood didn’t notice this and launches his brand new arc this week. It isn’t just the best Ultimate X-Men has been, this is some of the smartest stuff Marvel has published in years. Read it. 3. X-TREME X-MEN Vol. 1: XAVIER MUST DIE. Marvel’s EXILES book was a brilliant and fun way to turn nobody characters into compelling leads. It worked well because the throw-away nature of the characters meant that the stakes always felt higher and the characters and writing reflected that. Marvel basically relaunched EXILES but wanted a much worse name that reminded us of awful 90’s comics, Mountain Dew, and rollerblading. Hence; X-TREME X-Men. Despite their best efforts to make something unappealing this book is quite fun. If it goes on long enough and writer Greg Pak is allowed to cut loose and chart his own course this book could be something worth really cherishing. It is off to a great start.

BART SIMPSON #80. The shocking “The Death of Bart” storyline wraps up in this issue with a brutal and heartbreaking conclusion. Bongo has done a great job of making Bart’s descent into the murky underworld of Springfield’s drug and human trafficking rings feel visceral, frightening, and most of all compelling. Bart is a real character pushed too far and the things he has had to do, while not morally acceptable, are understandable to the reader. He has made himself a pariah, but he has also made himself the last honest man. Much like Hamlet, when you started reading The Death of Bart arc you knew it had to end with his murder, but it doesn’t make it any less harrowing. When Bart finally meets his end the tragedy of the moment comes with something else, a palpable sense of relief that a life lived too hard can finally come to rest. Like the gun barrel he slowly puts in his mouth, we as readers are now participants in a crime that is equal parts heinous and catharticly beautiful. And, in Bart’s passing, Springfield itself dies a little too. When his limp body, battered, broken, and abused, is pulled from the river, for the first time in years we see Bart as the child he always should have been but never could be. And as the stonefaced residents watch Marge breaking down and clawing at her own skin, each resident of Springfield knows their role in the death of a boy who never stood a chance. Bart has always worked well as a metaphor for the working classes struggle to define itself and for America’s ability to cannibalize it’s own young for the sake of some poorly defined idea of progress. In that, the death of the last boy in Springfield, USA is the death of us all. A beautiful and tragic conclusion to one of the great cartoons of all time. Ay Caramba, Bart. Ay Caramba.

Valiant‘s stunningly good relaunch continues with BLOODSHOT Vol. 1: SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE. An inverse of Captain America, Bloodshot is the story of a government super soldier program gone horribly wrong. The Valiant books are as smart and pretty as almost anything at the Big 2, but the fresh characters give the stories a chance to cut loose and provide twists and turns you won’t see coming. X-O Manowar and Harbinger have already released their first trades and are fast becoming fan favorites for the superhero set and I expect Bloodshot to follow suit. For anyone who feels like some of their “people punching people” books have started to become stale, Valiant is trying really hard to give you a fresh alternative. And at $9.99 for the collection why wouldn’t you buy it?

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Somewhere Around The Number Ten Best Comics That Nobody Told You About

Part 1:

I love Chris Ware. Bit redundant to say so this holiday season with everyone and their sister buying Building Stories, but with so much comic awesomeness that happened in 2012; between Charles Burn’s second installment to his X’ed Out trilogy, The Hive, and Brian K. Vaughn’s SagaSAGA… It’s too easy for amazing comics to get lost in the stacks, so I’m here to give my somewhere around the number 10 best comics of 2012 that nobody told you about…

LOSE #4

Michael DeForge might be the most prolific cartoonist working right now. He pumps more work and at a higher quality that would make any other cartoonist want to quit, or work harder…..no quit thats the correct response. On top of Lose #4 this year you can also see his work in the pages of Adventure Time comics, where he does the backgrounds,variant covers, anthology stories in  Nobrow 7 (more on that in a bit) and the newest  KUS, not to mention his on going serial Ant Comics, oh and his porn comic that he designs that features work by Johnny Negron, Brandon Graham, and Jillian Tamaki….more on all of them latter too…Bottom line, DeForge has a hand in everything and you’re probably a fan of his already, so read Lose, or Ant comics, or KUS, or Nobrow, or one of the million other things he worked on this year. King of comics 2012 goes to DeForge, no contest.

The Underwater Welder

Did I mention that DeForge is Canadian? Canadians….must be a universal sigh when cartoonist’s who aren’t Canadian talk about them. Jeff Lemire is another cartoonist hailing from The Great White North. Lemire had a full year of releases with Sweet Tooth Volume 4 and 5, the reprinting of his Xeric grant book Lost Dogs and Underwater Welder. Underwater Welder is for lovers of well paced, clear story telling, and the Twilight Zone. Lemire has an economy to his comics, the art is quick yet purposeful in the same manner as the writing, which rewards the reader with a world that they can envelope themselves in. Lemire is an odd school of cartooning, he’s not so deep into independent styled comics as DeForge, but he isn’t mainstream either (though he does write the only two books at DC still worth reading Animal Man, & Frankenstein Agent of Shade ). He’s a cartoonist in love with genre but doesn’t mistake comics to be only that.

Nipper Volume 3

Nipper Volume 3 finally came out! WOOOOOOO! I might be the only American to love Nipper so go buy it and prove my gross presumption wrong. Keeping in theme with brilliant Canadian cartoonists, Nipper volume 3 is the Canadian version of Family Circus, if Family Circus was anything like a real family and not so adorable that even your grandmother finds it lame. Always silent, black and white line work with one beautiful saturation of red dropped into each panel, Doug Wright creates multi-layered story telling, in the most simple yet still incredible complicated drawing. Just go look already, and then come meet me for coffee to talk about it, I’ll be here till next year trying to describe why it’s so effffffing smart.

Diary Comics 4

Dustin Harbin is yet another broken hearted cartoonist, upset that his nationality isn’t Canadian. Diary Comics 4 starts with Dustin talking about how amazing it is to be in attendance at the Doug Wright rewards (the Canadian version of the Eisners), and how he wishes we as American could take comics as seriously as they do. Why can’t we folks? Dustin’s beautifully minimalist drawings deceive readers with their simplicity, when they are really just the right amount of information needed, each mark done with purpose in mind and simply decroative. Go read em’ they’re good. And if your not a fan of memoir, you just like the punching and kicking comics, he did letter Casanova sooo…..I don’t know Matt Fraction wrote Iron Man for like a century right? See the full picture of creators not just the characters you like….

Pope Hat #3

Pope Hat #3 by Ethan Rilly. Rilly is surprise surprise, another Canadian. Pope Hats is technically 3 issues deep but you really only need/want two and three. In Pope Hats Rilly tells the story of Franny, a young law clerk at a massive law firm, picture Wall Street with less Charlie Sheen….okay no Charlie Sheen, just that one part where he gets punched in the face by Michael Douglas… Rilly drawings show traces of his influences but they don’t unhinge the story. You can see traces of Doug Wright’s drapery in the clothing, and bits of Shultz popping up in the rendering of grass and clouds. It’s like a love letter to days past when cartooning was a profession and getting a weekly strip in a newspaper was the dream. Pope Hats narrative shares a similar tone of nostalgia with its drawing, that bitter sweet pain, from an old wound.

Thats the end of Part 1. Part 2 on Sunday 12/23/12.

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LOEG Century 2009

We’re halfway through 2012, and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Century: 2009 is finally here to close out Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s examination of the past hundred years.  And a doozy of a century it was, my friends.  From horse-and-buggy to the convertible to an abandoned and starving space program.  From rifles to nukes to drones.  What fun!  It’s the opinion of Moore and O’Neill that our fictions are currently in as much of a shambles as our economy and environment. While I don’t entirely agree, 2009 makes the point nicely.

Century has been criticized by some as inferior to previous volumes of the League, often because it simply isn’t as accessible.  While the first two volumes focused on a well-known cast of characters, many of whom have been portrayed often in film and television, Century veered into more esoteric territory, taking much of its cast from short stories and ’60s British crime films, as well as taking heavy inspiration of Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s Three-Penny Opera.  Furthermore 1910 and 1969 both felt unfocused – the character’s were never sure of their mission, and failed to have much effect, especially in 1910.

Much of that is reversed in 2009 – all the cards are on the table, the end is nigh, and the antagonist is one that every modern reader and moviegoer has at least a passing familiarity with.  If you don’t know it is yet I won’t give it away, but I will tell you that he uses his “wand” in some new ways here.  Along with cameos from Dr. Who, Charlie’s Angels, and every James Bond ever, Prospero puts in his first appearance since Black Dossier, as does another major player you’ll recognize.

The criticism of modern fiction is also more focused, and raises some worthwhile questions.  One of the character’s calls modern fiction “banal and reassuring,” which shouldn’t be a shock to anyone, but it still bears repeating.  Century also raises the issue of whether or not by changing the stories we tell each other, we can change the world we live in.  And that needs doing.

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The Weekly Pulse – Danosaurs vs. Raviens

NEW camera! NEW format! NEW co-host! Everything’s new- and also late. Sorry. All this NEW took some time to figure out. Plus, this is one honking slab of episode: clocking in at a beefy 20 minutes! Our intrepid dou wade into the merky waters of Barry Sonnenfeld’s Dinosaurs Vs Aliens, take a hit off of Alan Moore’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen III: Century #3 2009, and get all wibbly-wobbly over Star Trek TNG / Doctor Who Assimilation #2! All that, and a ton more!

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The Weekly Pulse – Mars Attracts!

AK AK, AK AK AK.

– DO NOT RUN. WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS. WE HAVE COMICS FOR YOU. COME CLOSER. CLOSER TO OUR DEATH-ER.. COMICS RAY AND GET YOUR COMICS. IGNORE THE SCREAMING OF YOUR COMPANIONS. THEY ARE SCREAMING WITH HAPPINESS BECAUSE OF ALL THE GREAT COMICS.

COMICS LIKE SAGA 4. IT IS NOT COVERED IN ACID. AND AVENGERS VS. X-MEN 6. IT IS NOT MADE OF BUZZ-SAWS.

IF YOU SMELL FIRE, IT IS BECAUSE LOST DOGS IS A REAL BARN BURNER. NOT BECAUSE WE HAVE VAPORIZED YOUR BARN. –

AK, AK AK.

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Saturday May 5th is Free Comic Book Day for 2012!

Forbidden Planet NYC will be giving away bags containing one of each Free Comic Book Day comic that we receive, as well as a coupon for purchases both in-store and online! These are on a first come, first served basis, so ARRIVE EARLY! All-Ages bags will also be provided so that comics fans young and old can enjoy Free Comic Book Day. Once we give out all complete bags we will then distribute any remaining FCBD comics at our discretion. PLUS, we may also have some unannounced stuffs to give away as well.

These goodie bags go fast, so once again: ARRIVE EARLY!

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The Weekly Pulse – Here’s the Beef

Well, you’ve all heard the news. Shia LaBeouf made two mini-comics. I can’t remember the last time a mini-comic has made quite a stir. Well, Dan takes a look at Mr. LaBeouf’s first foray into the land of mini-comics, as well all of the latest mainstream comics to come into the store. Plus the latest zine from one of our assistant managers; Matt D.; and the latest mini-comic from your humble cameraman/director/graphic designer/me! All this, and info on this coming Monday’s in-store signing and a shout out to this weekend’s SPACE convention in Ohio!

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STORE-WIDE SALE OCTOBER 14 – 16!

Take a break from the Con this weekend for some great deals at

Forbidden Planet NYC!

*Existing discounts or specials; e.g. Magic the Gathering Booster Packs, Student Discounts, Manga Deals; do not apply.

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Eisner Award Nominations 2010

This year’s Eisner Award nominations have been announced.  Presented at a gala event during San Diego Comic-Con in July, the Awards are named after Will Eisner and are voted on by comics creators, editors, publishers, and retailers.

For more information on the Awards and their history please visit Comic-Con’s Eisner Awards FAQs.

(Note: links to items available on Forbidden Planet NYC’s website are highlighted wherever applicable in the list below, so forgive all the color changes.  But feel free to pursue any works you’ve not yet read or sound interesting)

And the Nominees are…

Best Short Story

fromwonderland

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot)

Best Continuing Series

irredeemable

Best Limited Series or Story Arc

Best New Series

Best Publication for Kids

  • Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute, by Jarrett J. Krosoczeka (Knopf)
  • The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, by Eleanor Davis (Bloomsbury)
  • Tiny Tyrant vol. 1: The Ethelbertosaurus, by Lewis Trondheim and Fabrice Parme (First Second)
  • The TOON Treasury of Classic Children’s Comics, edited by Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly (Abrams ComicArts/Toon)
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz hc, by L. Frank Baum, Eric Shanower, and Skottie Young (Marvel)

Best Publication for Teens

  • Angora Napkin, by Troy Little (IDW)
  • Beasts of Burden, by Evan Dorkin and Jill Thompson (Dark Horse)
  • A Family Secret, by Eric Heuvel (Farrar Straus Giroux/Anne Frank House)
  • Far Arden, by Kevin Cannon (Top Shelf)
  • I Kill Giants tpb, by Joe Kelly and JM Ken Niimura (Image)

Best Humor Publication

littlelulu19

Best Anthology

  • Abstract Comics, edited by Andrei Molotiu (Fantagraphics)
  • Bob Dylan Revisited, edited by Bob Weill (Norton)
  • Flight 6, edited by Kazu Kibuishi (Villard)
  • Popgun vol. 3, edited by Mark Andrew Smith, D. J. Kirkbride, and Joe Keatinge (Image)
  • Syncopated: An Anthology of Nonfiction Picto-Essays, edited by Brendan Burford (Villard)
  • What Is Torch Tiger? edited by Paul Briggs (Torch Tiger)

Best Digital Comic

Best Reality-Based Work

Best Adaptation from Another Work

Best Graphic Album-New

Best Graphic Album-Reprint

mapofmyheart

Best Archival Collection/Project-Strips

Best Archival Collection/Project-Comic Books

Best U.S. Edition of International Material

Best U.S. Edition of International Material-Asia

pluto1

Best Writer

Best Writer/Artist

Best Writer/Artist-Nonfiction

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team

madamexanadu2

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)

  • É Bravo, My mommy is in America and she met Buffalo Bill (Fanfare/Ponent Mon)
  • Mauro Cascioli, Justice League: Cry for Justice (DC)
  • Nicolle Rager Fuller, Charles Darwin on the Origin of Species: A Graphic Adaptation (Rodale Books)
  • Jill Thompson, Beasts of Burden (Dark Horse); Magic Trixie and the Dragon (HarperCollins Children’s Books)
  • Carol Tyler, You’ll Never Know: A Good and Decent Man (Fantagraphics)

Best Cover Artist

Best Coloring

Best Lettering

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism

  • Alter Ego, edited by Roy Thomas (TwoMorrows)
  • ComicsAlliance, edited by Laura Hudson www.comicsalliance.com
  • Comics Comics, edited by Timothy Hodler and Dan Nadel
    (www.comicscomicsmag.com) (PictureBox)
  • The Comics Journal, edited by Gary Groth, Michael Dean, and Kristy Valenti (Fantagraphics)
  • The Comics Reporter, produced by Tom Spurgeon
    (www.comicsreporter.com)

Best Comics-Related Book

artofharveykurtzman

Best Publication Design

  • Absolute Justice, designed by Curtis King and Josh Beatman (DC)
  • The Brinkley Girls, designed by Adam Grano (Fantagraphics)
  • Gahan Wilson: 50 Years of Playboy Cartoons, designed by Jacob Covey (Fantagraphics)
  • Life and Times of Martha Washington, designed by David Nestelle (Dark Horse Books)
  • Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz, designed by Philippe Ghielmetti (Sunday Press)
  • Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? designed by Neil Egan and Brian Fies (Abrams ComicArts)

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Celebrating SURROGATES movie, Top Shelf has $3 Sale.

sale_tag

Celebrating the premiere of the Bruce Willis film, Surrogates publisher Top Shelf is having a THREE DOLLAR graphic novel web sale starting today through the Surrogates premiere September 25.

There is more though! Via Press Release, Top Shelf PR guru Chris Staros says you can download a Surrogates app for the iPhone which includes the first two issues of the ground breaking series for 99 cents, and the rest of the issues for the same price.

Staros says this web sale deal is good for retailers as well, but to email in regards to it.  Below is a list of $3 sales and slashed prices on some books completely worth your time like Lost Girls, Jeff Lemire’s Essex County and Blankets.

— $3 Books: The Barefoot Serpent, The Country Nurse, Sulk,
After the Snooter, That Salty Air, and more!
— $3 Books: Please Release, Tales of Woodsman Pete,
Less Than Heroes, Fox Bunny Funny, The King, and more!
— $3 Books: Regards from Serbia, Comic Book Artist,
Hutch Owen, Delayed Replays, Micrographica, and more!

— Slashed Prices: The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,
Lost Girls, From Hell, Blankets, Carnet De Voyage, and more!
— Slashed Prices: The Surrogates, Essex County,
Swallow Me Whole, Clumsy, Veeps, and more!
— Slashed Prices: Far Arden, Super Spy, Owly, Korgi,
Johnny Boo, and more!

Details on the sale can be found at the Top Shelf website.

Happy shopping!

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“Owly” to star in animated film premiering at San Diego Comic Con.

Released today, Andy Runton’s award winning kid’s comic “Owly” will star in its own animated short film at the San Diego Comic Con.  From the release:

Directed by Moto Sakakibara and storyboarded by creator Andy Runton.  Prominently featured will be Runton’s innovative “Pictomation,” a storytelling device in which the characters’ thoughts and feelings are animated with iconic and expressive images rather than dialogue, enabling fans of all ages, languages, and backgrounds to enjoy the show.

For a sample check out Sprite Animation’s website on the short film.  Owly, is a great gift if you happen to have a little one. I bring back an Owly comic for the 4 year old son of one of my best friends from Lake Placid. This little one I’ll eventually show the delights that is Jeff Smith’s Bone, once he gets a bit older.  I can’t imagine a better comic related gift for a wee one than this.

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