Life After reading this will be better

 

There’s really only one book that I care about this week. Maybe not the only one I care about, but the only book I really want to talk about. (Mostly because it’s hot and I spent all weekend killing spiders and blowing up pies with fireworks). Alright, you could say I got lazy, but I’ll never be to lazy to sing the eternally lauded praises of

Life After #1 By Joshua Hale Fialkov and Gabo-It’s a grand premise centered around some matrix-esque themes of being the only one truly awake in the infinite loop of life. But instead of that loop taking place in a computer generated existence, our protagonist finds himself journeying through the clutches of heaven, hell, and every other layer taught to you by your catechism teacher. The high concept of life, death, struggle against the mundane, and you know, saving the world, is back dropped with a snarky Hemmingway as a guide, and first-season-of-Lost questions that get you jacked up to read every issue because you need to know what’s happening! why is this happening?! I’m so curious and excited to find out what’s happening! The expert hands of Fialkov (Bunker, The Ultimates) and somewhat new to the scene, but no less brilliant hands of Gabo, give holy life to a book that is high energy goofy, juxtaposed with serious moments of salvation.  And covers are drawn by Nick Pitarra! (Manhattan Projects) This is a must must must buy! I guess I’ll talk about some other books, lightning round style!

Spread #1-Cthulu monsters, meets zombie reincarnation, meets Lone Wolf and Cub.

Shutter #4-More monsters! Some friend, some foe. But Kate stands her ground!

Grayson #1-I don’t know the last time I mentioned a DC book on this thing, but Tim Seeley (Revival) is writing this back from the dead character in an unexpected way.

Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me TP-This is the final memoir of the esteemed curmudgeon, Harvey Pekar, and a timely one at that. Illustrated by J.T. Waldman, Pekar reflects on growing up in a pro-Israel household, and his gradual realization that the current state has come a long way from the biblical ideal he grew up with. Considering the current resurgence of major conflict in the region, Pekar’s interweaving tale of history and dissatisfaction couldn’t come at a better time for those looking to get a little bit of a history lesson.

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