Troy’s Toys, But with Comics: End O’ May edition

NTW-Cv30-01ba5Nightwing #30

Tim Seeley/Tom King/Javier Garron/Jorge Lucas/Mikel Janin

DC Comics/$3.99

Read this issue to learn the final fate of Dick Grayson (which was revealed like 2 months ago)! Stay for the debut of Helena Bertinelli’s questionable new costume design.

If there was anyone who’s suffered the most from Forever Evil (aside from the people who actually paid for it), it’s been Nightwing. The homie Dick Grayson got the bejesus beat out of him by an evil Justice League and his secret identity exposed to the world, much like Peter Parker did during Civil War several years ago. However, unlike Spidey, Dick has no wife to offer up to Satan to magically retcon away his problems, so now he has to deal with being outed. BUT WAIT, the world thinks he’s dead (well everyone but Batman, Cyborg and several villains), problem solved!

Nightwing 30 is the “final”issue of the series, setting up July’s new Grayson series. In that series’ defense, the regular creative team of Tom King, Tim Seeley and Mikel Janin get to tell a fun prelude in the final chapter of the book  that sets the upcoming series up nicely. What stinks is that it’s that the two other stories leading up to it are not so good.

The first story, featuring art by Javier Garron, shows Dr Leslie Thompson being attacked by a crazy cult of serial killers. Fear not, the good doctor is saved by Helena Bertinelli  in her new Skullgirls cosplay. While the writing in this chapter is relatively solid, the art is kinda ugly, and not in the stylish sort of way. We also get another stereotypical multi-color hair Japanese assassin cliche, which ughhh, tired troupe is tired. The 2nd story deals with Dick and Batman throwing down because of reasons? It’s an ugly and violent story drawn by Jorge Lucas that makes little to no sense with the rest of the book. Batman comes off as a jerk, it’s super-bloody for no apparent reason and there’s some swiped Chris Nolan dialogue which doesn’t fit the scene and is ultimately several shades of dumb. Needless to say, I am not a fan, despite there being a panel where Batman kicks a motorcycle in half.

That being said, that final chapter is great. Once the book is freed of Batman and Forever Evil nonsense, we get our first taste of what’s to come from the Grayson series. It looks greats and feels really fun, even if Dick Grayson is running around in Clint Barton’s hoodie for some reason. And the Helena Bertinelli we get here is a major  visual improvement, looking like a rad Jamie McKelvie redesign opposed to a titillating fighting game character.

It’s kinda hard to recommend Nightwing #30 given the overall quality of the book. Some readers may find some enjoyment in it, but honestly, you can wait for Grayson #1 and see the proper creative shine.

trees1Trees #1

Warren Ellis/Jason Howard

Image $2.99

Warren Ellis doing weird Warren Ellis things is a good way to get me to buy your comic most of the time. I’m generally a fan of Ellis and the bulk  of his creator owned work, and even with some really strong art from Jason Howard, the Trees debut issue didn’t do much for it.

Great visuals aside,  Ellis spends too much time jumping from location to location in this issue, giving us brief glimpses of the cast. I’d be fine with this if these characters were actually interesting, but since we spend so little time with them, it’s hard to actually get attached to any of them.

My issues aside, there’s a chance that this book may read better collected once more issues are out. There’s a ton of potential, and the argument that the world of Tree is a political allegory for modern America can definitely be made. I’m just a little disappointed with this debut issue.

ms-marvel-4Ms. Marvel #4

G Willow Wilson/Adrian Alphona/Ian Herring

Marvel $2.99

Ms. Marvel is becoming a book that’s approaching Saga-levels of difficult to review. I say this, because much like the previous 3 issues, it’s comics done right.

Wilson and Alphona are approaching Lee/Dikto levels of perfection when it comes to writing Kamala’s adventures. There’s some action, boy drama, and issues with her family and to an extent, her faith. And it all works, looks great and ultimately makes for a delightful read. Adrian Alphona‘s art (masterfully colored by Ian Herring, who literally makes parts of this book shine) somehow manages to improve with every issue, cramming his pages full of fantastic levels of detail and even some Chip Zdarsky-level sight gags, be it background jokes, facial expressions or a villain wearing a shirt that straight up says his a bad guy.

G. Willow Wilson‘s dialogue, while always good, gives Brain K. Vaughn a run for his money with issue 4. Our new Ms Marvel’s interactions with her mother and BFF Bruno take up most of the book, and really capture what a modern teenager would sound like. It’s great stuff.

With all I mentioned above, as well as another striking cover by Jamie McKelvie, Ms. Marvel remains the break out Marvel comic of 2014. There’s no fear of this book getting cancelled early it seems, and you really owe it to yourself to read it if you’re not already.

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